Improve vs Discipline - What's the difference?

improve | discipline | Related terms |

Improve is a related term of discipline.


As verbs the difference between improve and discipline

is that improve is (lb) to make (something) better; to increase the value or productivity (of something) while discipline is .

improve

English

Alternative forms

* emprove (obsolete)

Verb

(improv)
  • (lb) To make (something) better; to increase the value or productivity (of something).
  • :
  • :
  • *{{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-22, volume=407, issue=8841, page=70, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= Engineers of a different kind , passage=Private-equity nabobs bristle at being dubbed mere financiers. Piling debt onto companies’ balance-sheets is only a small part of what leveraged buy-outs are about, they insist. Improving the workings of the businesses they take over is just as core to their calling, if not more so. Much of their pleading is public-relations bluster.}}
  • (lb) To become better.
  • :
  • :
  • *
  • *:“My Continental prominence is improving ,” I commented dryly. ¶ Von Lindowe cut at a furze bush with his silver-mounted rattan. ¶ “Quite so,” he said as dryly, his hand at his mustache. “I may say if your intentions were known your life would not be worth a curse.”
  • (lb) To disprove or make void; to refute.
  • *(William Tyndale) (1494-1536)
  • *:Neither can any of them make so strong a reason which another cannot improve .
  • (lb) To disapprove of; to find fault with; to reprove; to censure.
  • :
  • :(Chapman)
  • *(William Tyndale) (1494-1536)
  • *:When he rehearsed his preachings and his doing unto the high apostles, they could improve nothing.
  • (lb) To use or employ to good purpose; to turn to profitable account.
  • :
  • *(Isaac Barrow) (1630-1677)
  • *:We shall especially honour God by improving diligently the talents which God hath committed to us.
  • *(Joseph Addison) (1672-1719)
  • *:a hint that I do not remember to have seen opened and improved
  • *(William Blackstone) (1723-1780)
  • *:The court seldom fails to improve the opportunity.
  • *(Isaac Watts) (1674-1748)
  • *:How doth the little busy bee / Improve each shining hour.
  • *(George Washington) (1732-1799)
  • *:True policy, as well as good faith, in my opinion, binds us to improve the occasion.
  • Synonyms

    * (to make something better) ameliorate, better, batten, enhance * See also

    Antonyms

    * (to make something worse) deteriorate, worsen * (to become worse) deteriorate, worsen

    Derived terms

    * improvement

    discipline

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A controlled behaviour; self-control.
  • * Rogers
  • The most perfect, who have their passions in the best discipline , are yet obliged to be constantly on their guard.
  • An enforced compliance or control.
  • * '>citation
  • A systematic method of obtaining obedience.
  • * C. J. Smith
  • Discipline aims at the removal of bad habits and the substitution of good ones, especially those of order, regularity, and obedience.
  • A state of order based on submission to authority.
  • * Dryden
  • Their wildness lose, and, quitting nature's part, / Obey the rules and discipline of art.
  • A punishment to train or maintain control.
  • * Addison
  • giving her the discipline of the strap
  • A set of rules regulating behaviour.
  • A flagellation as a means of obtaining sexual gratification.
  • A specific branch of knowledge or learning.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-08-03, volume=408, issue=8847, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= Boundary problems , passage=Economics is a messy discipline : too fluid to be a science, too rigorous to be an art. Perhaps it is fitting that economists’ most-used metric, gross domestic product (GDP), is a tangle too. GDP measures the total value of output in an economic territory. Its apparent simplicity explains why it is scrutinised down to tenths of a percentage point every month.}}
    (Bishop Wilkins)
  • A category in which a certain art, sport or other activity belongs.
  • Synonyms

    * (branch or category) field, sphere * (punishment) penalty, sanction

    Antonyms

    * spontaneity

    Derived terms

    * academic discipline

    Verb

    (disciplin)
  • To train someone by instruction and practice.
  • To teach someone to obey authority.
  • To punish someone in order to (re)gain control.
  • To impose order on someone.
  • Synonyms

    * drill