What is the difference between deserve and brook?

deserve | brook |


As verbs the difference between deserve and brook

is that deserve is to be entitled to, as a result of past actions; to be worthy to have while brook is (transitive|obsolete|except in scots) to use; enjoy; have the full employment of.

As a noun brook is

a body of running water smaller than a river; a small stream.

deserve

English

Verb

  • To be entitled to, as a result of past actions; to be worthy to have.
  • :After playing so well, the team really deserved their win .
  • :After what he did, he deserved to go to prison .
  • :This argument deserves a closer examination.
  • *Bible, Job xi. 6
  • *:God exacteth of thee less than thine iniquity deserveth .
  • *Thackeray
  • *:John Gay deserved to be a favourite.
  • (obsolete) To earn, win.
  • *1590 , Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene , III.vii:
  • *:That gentle Lady, whom I loue and serue, / After long suit and weary seruicis, / Did aske me, how I could her loue deserue , / And how she might be sure, that I would neuer swerue.
  • (obsolete) To reward, to give in return for service.
  • *:
  • *:Gramercy saide the kynge / & I lyue sir Lambegus I shal deserue hit / And thenne sir Lambegus armed hym / and rode after as fast as he myghte
  • (obsolete) To serve; to treat; to benefit.
  • *Massinger
  • *:A man that hath / So well deserved me.
  • Synonyms

    * merit * See also

    Usage notes

    * This is a catenative verb that takes the to infinitive . See

    Anagrams

    *

    brook

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) .

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To use; enjoy; have the full employment of.
  • To earn; deserve.
  • (label) To bear; endure; support; put up with; tolerate (usually used in the negative, with an abstract noun as object ).
  • * {{quote-book, year=1922, author=(Ben Travers)
  • , chapter=6, title= A Cuckoo in the Nest , passage=But Sophia's mother was not the woman to brook defiance. After a few moments' vain remonstrance her husband complied. His manner and appearance were suggestive of a satiated sea-lion.}}
  • * 2005 , Nicholas Ostler, Empires of the Word: A Language History of the World , Harper:
  • Nevertheless, Garcilaso does claim that the Spaniards ‘who were unable to brook the length of the discourse, had left their places and fallen on the Indians’.
    Derived terms
    *

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl), from (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A body of running water smaller than a river; a small stream.
  • *Bible, (w) viii. 7
  • *:The Lord thy God bringeth thee into a good land, a land of brooks of water.
  • *(William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)
  • *:empties itself, as doth an inland brook / into the main of waters
  • *
  • *:But then I had the [massive] flintlock by me for protection. ¶.
  • A water meadow.
  • Low, marshy ground.
  • Synonyms
    * beck * burn * coulee * creek * stream