Scoff vs Derogatory - What's the difference?

scoff | derogatory |


As nouns the difference between scoff and derogatory

is that scoff is derision; ridicule; a derisive or mocking expression of scorn, contempt, or reproach or scoff can be (south africa) food while derogatory is a trade-line on a credit report that includes negative credit history.

As a verb scoff

is to jeer; laugh at with contempt and derision or scoff can be (british) to eat food quickly.

As an adjective derogatory is

tending to derogate, or lessen in value of someone; expressing derogation; detracting; injurious.

scoff

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) scof/skof, of Scandinavian origin. Compare (etyl) skaup, Danish skuffelse(noun)/skuffe(verb) and Old High German scoph.

Noun

(en noun)
  • Derision; ridicule; a derisive or mocking expression of scorn, contempt, or reproach.
  • * Shakespeare
  • With scoffs , and scorns, and contumelious taunts.
  • * 1852 , The Dublin University Magazine (page 66)
  • There were sneers, and scoffs , and inuendoes of some; prophecies of failure in a hundred ways
  • An object of scorn, mockery, or derision.
  • * Cowper
  • The scoff of withered age and beardless youth.
    Synonyms
    * derision, ridicule * See also

    Verb

  • To jeer; laugh at with contempt and derision.
  • * Goldsmith
  • Truth from his lips prevailed with double sway, / And fools who came to scoff , remained to pray.
    Synonyms
    * contemn, deride, sneer

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (South Africa) Food.
  • Verb

  • (British) To eat food quickly.
  • (South Africa) To eat.
  • Synonyms
    * (eat quickly) (l), (l) (US)

    See also

    * scuff

    derogatory

    English

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • Tending to derogate, or lessen in value of someone; expressing derogation; detracting; injurious.
  • * (rfdate) (Blackstone).
  • Acts of Parliament derogatory from the power of subsequent Parliaments bind not.
  • * (rfdate) (Macaulay).
  • His language was severely censured by some of his brother peers as derogatory to their other.
  • (legal) When referring to a clause in a testament: a sentence of secret character inserted by the testator alone, of which he reserves the knowledge to himself, with a condition that no will he may make thereafter shall be valid, unless this clause is inserted word for word; – a precaution to guard against later wills extorted by violence, or obtained by suggestion. (rfd-sense)
  • Usage notes

    In common language, particularly used in the phrase “derogatory term”, equivalent to less common pejorative, and in “derogatory statements”, equivalent to more casual offensive.

    Derived terms

    * derogatory clause/clause derogatory

    Noun

    (derogatories)
  • A trade-line on a credit report that includes negative credit history.
  • Synonyms

    * pejorative