Wraith vs Demon - What's the difference?

wraith | demon |


As nouns the difference between wraith and demon

is that wraith is a ghost or specter, especially seen just after a person's death while demon is demon.

wraith

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • A ghost or specter, especially seen just after a person's death.
  • * '>citation
  • * {{quote-book
  • , year=1917 , year_published=2008 , edition=HTML , editor= , author=Edgar Rice Burroughs , title=A Princess of Mars , chapter= citation , genre= , publisher=The Gutenberg Project , isbn= , page= , passage=We might indeed have been the wraiths of the departed dead upon the dead sea of that dying planet for all the sound or sign we made in passing. }}
  • * {{quote-book, passage=Like wraiths with the impediments of bodies they stumbled in the direction of Salthill faces.
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    Synonyms

    * See also

    Derived terms

    * wraithish * wraithful * wraithlike

    See also

    * (wikipedia "wraith")

    demon

    English

    (wikipedia demon)

    Alternative forms

    * daemon, (typically only used today for the sense of 'a Greek or Roman godling' ) * daimon (''typically only used in the sense of 'inner spirit' or 'personal guardian')

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • An evil spirit.
  • A fallen angel or Satanic divinity; a false god.
  • One’s inner spirit or genius, a daimon.
  • (Greek mythology, Roman mythology) A genius, a lar, the protective spirit or godling of a place, household, or individual.
  • A foible; a flaw in a person’s character.
  • The demon of stupidity haunts me whenever I open my mouth.
  • Someone of remarkable or diabolical energy or ability.
  • He’s a demon at the card tables.
  • (figurative) Anything with malevolent effects.
  • the demon drink

    Usage notes

    The original Greek and Roman meanings often employ synonyms or the variant spellings daimon' or ' daemon to differentiate them from the more common ecclesiastical sense.

    Synonyms

    * See also

    See also

    * imp * succubus * vampire * angel * hell * possession * possessed * dragon * werewolf * devil * larva ----