Wise vs Delight - What's the difference?

wise | delight |


As an acronym wise

is (aviation|nautical) (adjective).

As a noun delight is

joy; pleasure.

As a verb delight is

to give delight to; to affect with great pleasure; to please highly.

wise

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) wis, wys, from (etyl) . Cognate with Dutch wijs, German weise, Swedish vis. Compare wit.

Adjective

(er)
  • Showing good judgement or the benefit of experience.
  • Storing extra food for the winter was a wise decision.
    They were considered the wise old men of the administration.
    "It is a profitable thing, if one is wise , to seem foolish" - Aeschylus
  • (colloquial) Disrespectful.
  • Don't get wise with me!
    Usage notes
    * Objects: person, decision, advice, counsel, saying, etc.
    Antonyms
    * unwise * foolish
    Derived terms
    * crack wise * wisdom * wiseacre * wise apple * wiseass * wisecrack * wise guy * wise-hearted * wiseling * wiselike * wiseness * wizen * wizard * word to the wise

    Verb

    (wis)
  • To become wise.
  • (ergative, slang) Usually with "up", to inform or learn.
  • Mo wised him up about his situation.
    ''After Mo had a word with him, he wised up.

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (archaic) Way, manner, method.
  • * 1850 , The Burden of Nineveh , lines 2-5
  • ... the prize
    Dead Greece vouchsafes to living eyes, —
    Her Art for ever in fresh wise
    From hour to hour rejoicing me.
  • * 1866 , , A Ballad of Life , lines 28-30
  • A riven hood was pulled across his eyes;
    The token of him being upon this wise
    Made for a sign of Lust.
  • * 1926 , J. S. Fletcher, Sea Fog , page 308
  • And within a few minutes the rest of us were on our way too, judiciously instructed by Parkapple and the Brighton official, and disposed of in two taxi-cabs, the drivers of which were ordered to convey us to Rottingdean in such wise that each set his load of humanity at different parts of the village and at the same time that the bus was due to arrive at the hotel.
    Derived terms
    * -wise

    Etymology 3

    From (etyl) .

    Verb

  • (dialectal) to instruct
  • (dialectal) to advise; induce
  • (dialectal) to show the way, guide
  • (dialectal) to direct the course of, pilot
  • (dialectal) to cause to turn
  • delight

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Joy; pleasure.
  • * Bible, Proverbs xviii. 2
  • A fool hath no delight in understanding.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Sounds and sweet airs, that give delight and hurt not.
  • *{{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-08, volume=407, issue=8839, page=52, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= The new masters and commanders , passage=From the ground, Colombo’s port does not look like much. Those entering it are greeted by wire fences, walls dating back to colonial times and security posts. For mariners leaving the port after lonely nights on the high seas, the delights of the B52 Night Club and Stallion Pub lie a stumble away.}}
  • Something that gives great joy or pleasure.
  • * Milton:
  • Heaven's last, best gift, my ever new delight .
  • * (Greensleeves):
  • Greensleeves was all my joy / Greensleeves was my delight,

    Derived terms

    * undelight * delightful

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To give delight to; to affect with great pleasure; to please highly.
  • * Tennyson
  • Delight our souls with talk of knightly deeds.
  • (label) To have or take great pleasure
  • Derived terms

    * delight in

    Anagrams

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