Delight vs Delectate - What's the difference?

delight | delectate |


As verbs the difference between delight and delectate

is that delight is to give delight to; to affect with great pleasure; to please highly while delectate is to delight, to charm, to bring pleasure to.

As a noun delight

is joy; pleasure.

delight

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • Joy; pleasure.
  • * Bible, Proverbs xviii. 2
  • A fool hath no delight in understanding.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Sounds and sweet airs, that give delight and hurt not.
  • *{{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-08, volume=407, issue=8839, page=52, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= The new masters and commanders , passage=From the ground, Colombo‚Äôs port does not look like much. Those entering it are greeted by wire fences, walls dating back to colonial times and security posts. For mariners leaving the port after lonely nights on the high seas, the delights of the B52 Night Club and Stallion Pub lie a stumble away.}}
  • Something that gives great joy or pleasure.
  • * Milton:
  • Heaven's last, best gift, my ever new delight .
  • * (Greensleeves):
  • Greensleeves was all my joy / Greensleeves was my delight,

    Derived terms

    * undelight * delightful

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To give delight to; to affect with great pleasure; to please highly.
  • * Tennyson
  • Delight our souls with talk of knightly deeds.
  • (label) To have or take great pleasure
  • Derived terms

    * delight in

    Anagrams

    * *

    delectate

    English

    Verb

    (delectat)
  • To delight, to charm, to bring pleasure to.
  • To take delight in, to take pleasure in.
  • References

    * (Webster 1913) ----