Rig vs Deck - What's the difference?

rig | deck | Related terms |

Rig is a related term of deck.


As a noun rig

is (slang|nautical) the rigging of a sailing ship or other such craft or rig can be (uk|scotland|dialect) a ridge or rig can be (obsolete) a wanton; one given to unbecoming conduct.

As a verb rig

is to fit out with a harness or other equipment.

As an adjective deck is

thick.

rig

English

(wikipedia rig)

Etymology 1

Probably of Scandinavian origin. Compare Norwegian .

Noun

(en noun)
  • (slang, nautical) The rigging of a sailing ship or other such craft.
  • Special equipment or gear used for a particular purpose.
  • * The climbers each had a different rig for climbing that particular rockface.
  • (US) A large truck such as a semi-tractor.
  • * Every rig at the truckstop had custom-made mud-flaps.
  • The special apparatus used for drilling wells.
  • (informal) A costume or an outfit.
  • * My sister and I always made our own rigs for Halloween.
  • (slang, computing) A computer case, often modified for looks.
  • * 2004 , Radford Castro, Let Me Play: Stories of Gaming and Emulation (page 104)
  • When I saw a special version of Quake running on Voodoo hardware, I knew I would be forking out quite a bit of money on my gaming rig .
  • An imperfectly castrated horse, sheep etc.
  • (slang) Radio]] equipment, especially a [[CB radio, citizen's band transceiver.
  • Verb

  • To fit out with a harness or other equipment.
  • (nautical) To equip and fit (a ship) with sails, shrouds, and yards.
  • (informal) To dress or clothe in some costume.
  • To make or construct something in haste or in a makeshift manner.
  • To manipulate something dishonestly for personal gain or discriminatory purposes.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-08-10, volume=408, issue=8848, magazine=(The Economist), author=Schumpeter
  • , title= Cronies and capitols , passage=Policing the relationship between government and business in a free society is difficult.
  • (obsolete) To play the wanton; to act in an unbecoming manner; to play tricks.
  • * 1616 , (George Chapman), The Hymn to (Hermes), in ''The Whole Works of (Homer) (tr.),
  • Rigging and rifling all ways, and no noise / Made with thy soft feet, where it all destroys.
  • (obsolete) To make free with; hence, to steal; to pilfer.
  • (Tusser)

    Etymology 2

    See ridge.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (UK, Scotland, dialect) A ridge.
  • Etymology 3

    Compare wriggle.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete) A wanton; one given to unbecoming conduct.
  • (Fuller)
  • (obsolete) A sportive or unbecoming trick; a frolic.
  • * Cowper
  • He little dreamt when he set out / Of running such a rig .
  • (obsolete) A blast of wind.
  • * Burke
  • that uncertain season before the rigs of Michaelmas were yet well composed.
    (Wright)
    (Webster 1913)

    Anagrams

    * ----

    deck

    English

    Etymology 1

    (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Any flat surface that can be walked on: a balcony; a porch; a raised patio; a flat rooftop.
  • (lb) The floorlike covering of the horizontal sections, or compartments, of a ship. Small vessels have only one deck; larger ships have two or three decks.
  • :
  • *
  • *:Carried somehow, somewhither, for some reason, on these surging floods, were these travelers,. Even such a boat as the Mount Vernon offered a total deck space so cramped as to leave secrecy or privacy well out of the question, even had the motley and democratic assemblage of passengers been disposed to accord either.
  • A pack or set of playing cards.
  • A set of slides for a presentation.
  • *2011 , David Kroenke, Donald Nilson, Office 365 in Business
  • *:Navigate to the location where your PowerPoint deck is stored and select it.
  • (lb) A heap or store.
  • *(Philip Massinger) (1583-1640)
  • *:Whohath such trinkets / Ready in the deck .
  • Derived terms
    * afterdeck * below decks * flight deck * foredeck * forward deck * lower deck * poopdeck * quarterdeck * rear deck * stern deck

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (uncommon) To furnish with a deck, as a vessel.
  • (slang) In a fight or brawl, to knock someone to the floor, especially with a single punch.
  • Wow, did you see her deck that guy who pinched her?

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) .

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To dress (someone) up, to clothe with more than ordinary elegance
  • * 1919 ,
  • They call beautiful a dress, a dog, a sermon; and when they are face to face with Beauty cannot recognise it. The false emphasis with which they try to deck their worthless thoughts blunts their susceptibilities.
  • * Bible, Job xl. 10
  • Deck thyself now with majesty and excellency.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Deck my body in gay ornaments.
  • To decorate (something).
  • * Dryden
  • The dew with spangles decked the ground.
  • To cover; to overspread.
  • * Milton
  • to deck with clouds the uncoloured sky
    Usage notes
    * See deck out