Departure vs Deceased - What's the difference?

departure | deceased |


In legal|lang=en terms the difference between departure and deceased

is that departure is (legal) the desertion by a party to any pleading of the ground taken by him in his last antecedent pleading, and the adoption of another while deceased is (legal): one who has died in property law', the alternate term decedent is generally used in ' criminal law , “the deceased” refers to the victim of a homicide.

As nouns the difference between departure and deceased

is that departure is the act of departing or something that has departed while deceased is a dead person.

As an adjective deceased is

no longer alive.

departure

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • The act of departing or something that has departed.
  • * {{quote-book, year=1922, author=(Ben Travers), title=(A Cuckoo in the Nest)
  • , chapter=5 citation , passage=The departure was not unduly prolonged. In the road Mr. Love and the driver favoured the company with a brief chanty running: “Got it?—No, I ain't, 'old on,—Got it? Got it?—No, 'old on sir.”}}
  • * {{quote-news, year=2011, date=April 10, author=Alistair Magowan, work=BBC Sport
  • , title= Aston Villa 1-0 Newcastle , passage=Villa spent most of the second period probing from wide areas and had a succession of corners but despite their profligacy they will be glad to overturn the 6-0 hammering they suffered at St James' Park in August following former boss Martin O'Neill's departure .}}
  • A deviation from a plan or procedure.
  • * Prescott
  • any departure from a national standard
  • (euphemism) A death.
  • * Bible, 2 Tim. iv. 6
  • The time of my departure is at hand.
  • * Sir Philip Sidney
  • His timely departure barred him from the knowledge of his son's miseries.
  • (navigation) The distance due east or west made by a ship in its course reckoned in plane sailing as the product of the distance sailed and the sine of the angle made by the course with the meridian.
  • (legal) The desertion by a party to any pleading of the ground taken by him in his last antecedent pleading, and the adoption of another.
  • (Bouvier)
  • (obsolete) Division; separation; putting away.
  • * Milton
  • no other remedy but absolute departure

    Synonyms

    * leaving

    Antonyms

    * arrival

    Anagrams

    *

    deceased

    English

    Adjective

    (-)
  • No longer alive
  • * That parrot is definitely deceased , and when I purchased it not ’alf an hour ago, you assured me that its total lack of movement was due to it bein’ tired and shagged out following a prolonged squawk. Monty Python
  • Belonging to the dead.
  • * The executor’s commission for winding up the deceased estate was 3.5%.
  • (legal): One who has died. In property law', the alternate term decedent is generally used. In ' criminal law , “the deceased” refers to the victim of a homicide.
  • Synonyms

    * (no longer alive) asleep, at peace, at rest, dead, departed, late, gone

    Usage notes

    * Not to be confused with diseased (affected with or suffering from disease)

    Noun

    (deceased)
  • A dead person
  • * The deceased was interred in his local churchyard.
  • (plural deceased ) dead people
  • * A memorial to the deceased of two World Wars.
  • (legal): One who has died. In property law', the alternate term decedent is generally used. In ' criminal law , “the deceased” refers to the victim of a homicide.
  • Synonyms

    * (dead person) dead person, dead soul, deceased person, decedent, departed, late * dead people, dead souls, deceased people, decedents, departed

    Usage notes

    Deceased'' is commonly used in legal and journalistic settings. ''Departed is most commonly used in religious settings.