Crumb vs Debris - What's the difference?

crumb | debris |


As nouns the difference between crumb and debris

is that crumb is a small piece which breaks off from baked food (such as cake, biscuit or bread) while debris is .

As a verb crumb

is to cover with crumbs.

crumb

English

(wikipedia crumb)

Noun

(en noun)
  • A small piece which breaks off from baked food (such as cake, biscuit or bread).
  • :
  • *(Bible), (w) xvi. 21
  • *:desiring to be fed with the crumbs which fell from the rich man's table
  • *
  • *:At twilight in the summer there is never anybody to fear—man, woman, or cat—in the chambers and at that hour the mice come out. They do not eat parchment or foolscap or red tape, but they eat the luncheon crumbs .
  • (lb) A bit, small amount.
  • :
  • The soft internal portion of bread, surrounded by crust.
  • *Old song
  • *:Dust unto dust, what must be, must; / If you can't get crumb , you'd best eat crust.
  • A mixture of sugar, cocoa and milk, used to make industrial chocolate.
  • (lb) A nobody, worthless person.
  • (lb) A body louse.
  • Synonyms

    * (crumbled food) crumbling * (small amount) see also .

    Derived terms

    * crumber * crumble * crumby, crummy * breadcrumb

    Verb

  • To cover with crumbs.
  • To break into crumbs or small pieces with the fingers; to crumble.
  • to crumb bread

    Derived terms

    * crumbed

    debris

    English

    Alternative forms

    *

    Noun

    (-)
  • Rubble, wreckage, scattered remains of something destroyed.
  • * {{quote-news, year=2012, date=December 21, author=David M. Halbfinger, Charles V. Bagli and Sarah Maslin Nir, title=On Ravaged Coastline, It’s Rebuild Deliberately vs. Rebuild Now, work=New York Times citation
  • , passage=His neighbors were still ripping out debris . But Mr. Ryan, a retired bricklayer who built his house by hand 30 years ago only to lose most of it to Hurricane Sandy, was already hard at work rebuilding. }}
  • Litter and discarded refuse.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-07-20, volume=408, issue=8845, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= Welcome to the plastisphere , passage=[The researchers] noticed many of their pieces of [plastic marine] debris sported surface pits around two microns across. Such pits are about the size of a bacterial cell. Closer examination showed that some of these pits did, indeed, contain bacteria, […].}}
  • The ruins of a broken-down structure
  • (geology) Large rock fragments left by a melting glacier etc.
  • Anagrams

    *