Divine vs Dark - What's the difference?

divine | dark |


As adjectives the difference between divine and dark

is that divine is of or pertaining to a god while dark is having an absolute or (more often) relative lack of light.

As nouns the difference between divine and dark

is that divine is one skilled in divinity; a theologian while dark is a complete or (more often) partial absence of light.

As a verb divine

is to foretell (something), especially by the use of divination.

divine

English

(wikipedia divine)

Etymology 1

From (etyl) divin, from (etyl) .

Adjective

(en adjective)
  • of or pertaining to a god
  • eternal, holy, or otherwise godlike.
  • of superhuman or surpassing excellence
  • beautiful, heavenly
  • (obsolete) foreboding; prescient
  • * Milton
  • Yet oft his heart, divine of something ill, / Misgave him.
  • Relating to divinity or theology.
  • * South
  • church history and other divine learning
    Synonyms
    * (of or pertaining to a god) deific, godlike, godly * (sense) hallowed, holy, sacred * (of superhuman or surpassing excellence) supreme, ultimate * (sense) beautiful, delightful, exquisite, heavenly, lovely, magnificent, marvellous/marvelous, splendid, wonderful
    Antonyms
    * (of or pertaining to a god) undivine, ungodly * (sense) godless, secular, ungodly * (of superhuman or surpassing excellence) humdrum, mediocre, ordinary * (sense) horrible, horrid, nasty, unpleasant
    Derived terms
    * all-divine * argument from divine hiddenness * Book of Divine Worship * * * countenance divine * * divine afflatus * * divine command theory * divine countenance * divine fallacy * divine grace * divine guidance * divine healing * divine inspiration * divine intervention * divine judgement, divine judgment * divine kings * divine kingship * divine lady * divine language * divine law * * Divine Liturgy * divinely * Divine Mercy Sunday * divine messenger * Divine Mind * Divine Mother * divine move * Divine Mystery * divineness * Divine Office, divine office * divine polity * The Divine Praises * divine proportion * Divine Providence * divine ratio * divine retribution * divine revelation * divine right * divine rule * divine section * divine service * divine simplicity * divine spark * divinesse * * divine will healing * * Feast of the Divine Mercy * * indivine * Mother Divine * Revelation of Saint John the Divine * semi-divine, semidivine * * subdivine * * undivine * undivinelike

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • One skilled in divinity; a theologian.
  • * Denham
  • Poets were the first divines .
  • A minister of the gospel; a priest; a clergyman.
  • * J. Woodbridge
  • The first divines of New England were surpassed by none in extensive erudition.
  • God or a god, particularly in its aspect as a transcendental concept
  • Synonyms
    * (sense) clergyman, cleric, man of the cloth, theologian * (a deity) deity, god, God, Allah (Muslim)
    Derived terms
    * archdivine * school-divine

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) deviner, from (etyl) divino.

    Verb

    (divin)
  • to foretell (something), especially by the use of divination
  • * Bancroft
  • a sagacity which divined the evil designs
  • * Shakespeare
  • Darest thou divine his downfall?
  • to guess (something)
  • * 1874 ,
  • no secret can be told
    To any who divined it not before
  • * 1919 ,
  • If in the loneliness of his studio he wrestled desperately with the Angel of the Lord he never allowed a soul to divine his anguish.
  • * 2005 , .
  • I suppose that we truly are divining that what is is some third thing when we say that change and stability are.
  • to search for (underground objects or water) using a divining rod
  • To render divine; to deify.
  • * Spenser
  • Living on earth like angel new divined .
    Derived terms
    (derived terms) * divinable * divined * divinement * diviner * divineress * divining * divinise, divinize * divinister

    Anagrams

    * ----

    dark

    English

    Adjective

    (er)
  • Having an absolute or (more often) relative lack of light.
  • :
  • *
  • *:They burned the old gun that used to stand in the dark corner up in the garret, close to the stuffed fox that always grinned so fiercely. Perhaps the reason why he seemed in such a ghastly rage was that he did not come by his death fairly. And why else was he put away up there out of sight?—and so magnificent a brush as he had too.
  • *{{quote-magazine, date=2013-07-20, volume=408, issue=8845, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= Out of the gloom , passage=[Rural solar plant] schemes are of little help to industry or other heavy users of electricity. Nor is solar power yet as cheap as the grid. For all that, the rapid arrival of electric light to Indian villages is long overdue. When the national grid suffers its next huge outage, as it did in July 2012 when hundreds of millions were left in the dark , look for specks of light in the villages.}}
  • #(lb) .
  • #:
  • #Deprived of sight; blind.
  • #*(John Evelyn) (1620-1706)
  • #*:He was, I think, at this time quite dark , and so had been for some years.
  • (lb) Dull or deeper in hue; not bright or light.
  • :
  • *
  • *:Serene, smiling, enigmatic, she faced him with no fear whatever showing in her dark eyes. The clear light of the bright autumn morning had no terrors for youth and health like hers.
  • *
  • *:If I close my eyes I can see Marie today as I saw her then. Round, rosy face, snub nose, dark hair piled up in a chignon.
  • Hidden, secret, obscure.
  • *1603-1606 , (William Shakespeare), (King Lear) , i 1
  • *:Meantime we shall express our darker purpose
  • #Not clear to the understanding; not easily through; obscure; mysterious; hidden.
  • #*(William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)
  • #*:What's your dark meaning, mouse, of this light word?
  • #*1594- , (Richard Hooker),
  • #*:What may seem dark at the first, will afterward be found more plain.
  • #*(w) (1819-1885)
  • #*:the dark problems of existence
  • # Having racing capability not widely known.
  • Without moral or spiritual light; sinister, malign.
  • :
  • *(John Milton) (1608-1674)
  • *:Left him at large to his own dark designs.
  • Conducive to hopelessness; depressing or bleak.
  • :
  • * (1800-1859)
  • *:A deep melancholy took possession of him, and gave a dark tinge to all his views of human nature.
  • *(Washington Irving) (1783-1859)
  • *:There is, in every true woman's heart, a spark of heavenly fire, which beams and blazes in the dark hour of adversity.
  • Lacking progress in science or the arts; said of a time period.
  • *Sir (1614-1669)
  • *:The age wherein he lived was dark , but he / Could not want light who taught the world to see.
  • *(Arthur Hallam) (1811-1833)
  • *:The tenth century used to be reckoned by mediaeval historians as the darkest part of this intellectual night.
  • With emphasis placed on the unpleasant aspects of life; said of a work of fiction, a work of nonfiction presented in narrative form or a portion of either.
  • :
  • Synonyms

    * (relative lack of light) dim, gloomy, see also * (sinister or secret) hidden, secret, sinister, see also * (without morals) malign, sinister, see also * (of colour) deep, see also * (conducive to hopelessness) hopeless, negative, pessimistic * (lacking progress) unenlightened

    Antonyms

    * (relative lack of light) bright, light, lit * (of colour) bright, light, pale

    Derived terms

    * dark energy * dark flow * dark-haired * dark horse * dark matter * dark-skinned

    Noun

    (en-noun)
  • A complete or (more often) partial absence of light.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Here stood he in the dark , his sharp sword out.
  • * {{quote-book, year=1963, author=(Margery Allingham), title=(The China Governess)
  • , chapter=17 citation , passage=The face which emerged was not reassuring. It was blunt and grey, the nose springing thick and flat from high on the frontal bone of the forehead, whilst his eyes were narrow slits of dark in a tight bandage of tissue. […].}}
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-07-20, volume=408, issue=8845, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= Out of the gloom , passage=[Rural solar plant] schemes are of little help to industry or other heavy users of electricity. Nor is solar power yet as cheap as the grid. For all that, the rapid arrival of electric light to Indian villages is long overdue. When the national grid suffers its next huge outage, as it did in July 2012 when hundreds of millions were left in the dark , look for specks of light in the villages.}}
  • (uncountable) Ignorance.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Look, what you do, you do it still i' th' dark .
  • * John Locke
  • Till we perceive by our own understandings, we are as much in the dark , and as void of knowledge, as before.
  • (uncountable) Nightfall.
  • A dark shade or dark passage in a painting, engraving, etc.
  • * Dryden
  • The lights may serve for a repose to the darks', and the ' darks to the lights.

    Derived terms

    * after dark * all cats are gray in the dark * at dark * bedarken * before dark * Dark Ages * dark blue * dark brown * dark chocolate * dark comedy * Dark Continent * dark current * dark elves * darken * dark energy * darkey * dark fiber * darkfield * dark field * dark figure * darkful * dark glasses * dark horse * dark house * darkie * darkish * dark lantern * darkle * dark matter * dark meat * dark nebula * darkness * dark reaction * dark red * darkroom * dark-room * dark room * dark-skinned * dark side * darksome * dark space * dark star * darky * endark * oh dark thirty * pitch-dark * shot in the dark * whistle in the dark

    See also

    * black * shadow

    Statistics

    *

    Anagrams

    * 1000 English basic words ----