Paced vs Danced - What's the difference?

paced | danced |


As verbs the difference between paced and danced

is that paced is (pace) while danced is (dance).

paced

English

Verb

(head)
  • (pace)
  • Anagrams

    * ----

    pace

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) pas, (etyl) pas, and their source, (etyl) passus.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete) Passage, route.
  • # (obsolete) One's journey or route.
  • # (obsolete) A passage through difficult terrain; a mountain pass or route vulnerable to ambush etc.
  • #* 1590 , (Edmund Spenser), The Faerie Queene , III.1:
  • But when she saw them gone she forward went, / As lay her journey, through that perlous Pace [...].
  • # (obsolete) An aisle in a church.
  • Step.
  • # A step taken with the foot.
  • # The distance covered in a step (or sometimes two), either vaguely or according to various specific set measurements. How Many? A Dictionary of Units of Measurement : English Customary Weights and Measures, © Russ Rowlett and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (§: Distance , ¶ ? 6)
  • Even at the duel, standing 10 paces apart, he could have satisfied Aaron’s honor.
  • I have perambulated your field, and estimate its perimeter to be 219 paces .
  • Way of stepping.
  • # A manner of walking, running or dancing; the rate or style of how someone moves with their feet.
  • #* {{quote-news
  • , year=2012 , date=June 9 , author=Owen Phillips , title=Euro 2012: Netherlands 0-1 Denmark , work=BBC Sport citation , page= , passage=Netherlands, one of the pre-tournament favourites, combined their undoubted guile, creativity, pace and attacking quality with midfield grit and organisation.}}
  • # Any of various gaits of a horse, specifically a 2-beat, lateral gait.
  • Speed or velocity in general.
  • (cricket) A measure of the hardness of a pitch and of the tendency of a cricket ball to maintain its speed after bouncing.
  • The collective noun for donkeys.
  • * 1952 , G. B. Stern, The Donkey Shoe , The Macmillan Company (1952), page 29:
  • but at Broadstairs and other places along the coast, a pace of donkeys stood on the sea-shore expectant (at least, their owners were expectant) of children clamouring to ride.
  • * 2006 , " Drop the dead donkeys", The Economist , 9 November 2006:
  • A pace of donkeys fans out in different directions.
  • * 2007 , Elinor De Wire, The Lightkeepers' Menagerie: Stories of Animals at Lighthouses , Pineapple Press (2007), ISBN 9781561643905, page 200:
  • Like a small farm, the lighthouse compound had its chattering'' of chicks, ''pace'' of donkeys, ''troop'' of horses, and ''fold of sheep.
    Derived terms
    * pace car * pacemaker * pace setter * pacer

    Adjective

    (-)
  • (cricket) Describing a bowler who bowls fast balls.
  • Verb

    (pac)
  • Walk to and fro in a small space.
  • * 1874 , (Marcus Clarke), (For the Term of His Natural Life) Chapter V
  • Groups of men, in all imaginable attitudes, were lying, standing, sitting, or pacing up and down.
  • Set the speed in a race.
  • Measure by walking.
  • Derived terms
    * (set the speed in a race) pacemaker

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) '', “in peace”, ablative form of ''pax , “peace”.

    Preposition

    (English prepositions)
  • (formal) With all due respect to.
  • Usage notes
    Used when expressing a contrary opinion, in formal speech or writing.

    Etymology 3

    Alteration of Pasch.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Easter.
  • Derived terms
    * pace egg

    References

    danced

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (dance)

  • dance

    English

    Alternative forms

    * daunce (obsolete)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A sequence of rhythmic steps or movements usually performed to music, for pleasure or as a form of social interaction.
  • *
  • *:"I ought to arise and go forth with timbrels and with dances ; but, do you know, I am not inclined to revels? There has been a little—just a very little bit too much festivity so far …. Not that I don't adore dinners and gossip and dances; not that I do not love to pervade bright and glittering places."
  • A social gathering where dancing is the main activity.
  • *
  • *:"I ought to arise and go forth with timbrels and with dances; but, do you know, I am not inclined to revels? There has been a little—just a very little bit too much festivity so far …. Not that I don't adore dinners and gossip and dances ; not that I do not love to pervade bright and glittering places."
  • (lb) A fess that has been modified to zig-zag across the center of a coat of arms from dexter to sinister.
  • A genre of modern music characterised by sampled beats, repetitive rhythms and few lyrics.
  • (lb) The art, profession, and study of dancing.
  • A piece of music with a particular dance rhythm.
  • *
  • *:They stayed together during three dances , went out on to the terrace, explored wherever they were permitted to explore, paid two visits to the buffet, and enjoyed themselves much in the same way as if they had been school-children surreptitiously breaking loose from an assembly of grown-ups.
  • Hyponyms

    * See also

    Derived terms

    * dance music * dirty dance * fan dance * line dance * * war dance

    Verb

    (danc)
  • To move with rhythmic steps or movements, especially in time to music.
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=4 , passage=“Well,” I answered, at first with uncertainty, then with inspiration, “he would do splendidly to lead your cotillon, if you think of having one.” ¶ “So you do not dance , Mr. Crocker?” ¶ I was somewhat set back by her perspicuity.}}
  • To leap or move lightly and rapidly.
  • * Byron
  • Shadows in the glassy waters dance .
  • To perform the steps to.
  • To cause to dance, or move nimbly or merrily about.
  • * (William Shakespeare)
  • to dance our ringlets to the whistling wind
  • * (William Shakespeare)
  • Thy grandsire loved thee well; / Many a time he danced thee on his knee.

    Derived terms

    * dance attendance * dancer * dirty dance * line dance

    See also

    * * acrobatics * ballet * ballroom * disco * foxtrot * hiphop * jazz * modern * musical theatre * tap dancing * terpsichorean

    Anagrams

    *

    References

    1000 English basic words ----