Art vs Dance - What's the difference?

art | dance |


As a noun art

is .

As a verb dance is

.

art

English

Etymology 1

(etyl) (from (etyl) (m)).

Noun

(Art) (Art) (Art)
  • (uncountable) The conscious production or arrangement of sounds, colours, forms, movements, or other elements in a manner that affects the senses and emotions, usually specifically the production of the beautiful in a graphic or plastic medium.
  • (countable) Skillful creative activity, usually with an aesthetic focus.
  • (uncountable) The study and the product of these processes.
  • (uncountable) Aesthetic value.
  • (uncountable) Artwork.
  • (countable) A field or category of art, such as painting, sculpture, music, ballet, or literature.
  • (countable) A nonscientific branch of learning; one of the liberal arts.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-08-03, volume=408, issue=8847, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= Boundary problems , passage=Economics is a messy discipline: too fluid to be a science, too rigorous to be an art . Perhaps it is fitting that economists’ most-used metric, gross domestic product (GDP), is a tangle too. GDP measures the total value of output in an economic territory. Its apparent simplicity explains why it is scrutinised down to tenths of a percentage point every month.}}
  • (countable) Skill that is attained by study, practice, or observation.
  • * 1796 , , (The Monk) , Folio Society 1985, page 217:
  • A physician was immediately sent for; but on the first moment of beholding the corpse, he declared that Elvira's recovery was beyond the power of art .
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=4 , passage=The Celebrity, by arts unknown, induced Mrs. Judge Short and two other ladies to call at Mohair on an afternoon when Mr. Cooke was trying a trotter on the track. The three returned wondering and charmed with Mrs. Cooke; they were sure she had had no hand in the furnishing of that atrocious house.}}
    Synonyms
    * (Human effort) craft
    Antonyms
    * (Human effort) mundacity, nature, subsistence
    Quotations
    * 2005', "I tell her what Donald Hall says: that the problem with workshops is that they trivialize '''art by minimizing the terror." -July ''Harper's , Lynn Freed * 2009 , "Visual art is a subjective understanding or perception of the viewer as well as a deliberate/conscious arrangement or creation of elements like colours, forms, movements, sounds, objects or other elements that produce a graphic or plastic whole that expresses thoughts, ideas or visions of the artist." - Extended Essay on Visual Art, Alexander Brouwer
    Derived terms
    * abstract art * art class * art collection * art dealer * Art Deco * artefact, artifact * art exhibition * art film * art for art's sake * art form * artful * art gallery * art historian * art history * art house * artifice * artificial * art imitates life * artisan * artist * artiste * artistic * art journal * artless * art movie * art music * art nouveau * art object * art paper * art rock * art rooom * art school * arts degree * arts and crafts * art student * artsy * artsy-craftsy * art therapy * art union * artwork * artworker * arty * ASCII art * arty-farty * Bachelor of Arts * black art, black arts * body art * cave art * clip art * concept art * down to a fine art * fine arts * folk art * graphic art * high art * installation art * junk art * kinetic art * liberal arts * life imitates art * line art * martial art * Master of Arts * minimal art * modern art * * objet d'art * op art * optical art * outsider art * performance art * person of ordinary skill in the art * pixel art * plastic art * pop art * primitive art * prior art * process art * sand art * sequential art * seventh art * state-of-the-art * street art * term of art * traditional art * vernacular art * visual art * work of art * (art)

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl), from (etyl) .

    Verb

    (head)
  • (be)
  • How great thou art !

    See also

    * am * are * be * being * been * beest * was * wast * were * wert

    Statistics

    *

    dance

    English

    Alternative forms

    * daunce (obsolete)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A sequence of rhythmic steps or movements usually performed to music, for pleasure or as a form of social interaction.
  • *
  • *:"I ought to arise and go forth with timbrels and with dances ; but, do you know, I am not inclined to revels? There has been a little—just a very little bit too much festivity so far …. Not that I don't adore dinners and gossip and dances; not that I do not love to pervade bright and glittering places."
  • A social gathering where dancing is the main activity.
  • *
  • *:"I ought to arise and go forth with timbrels and with dances; but, do you know, I am not inclined to revels? There has been a little—just a very little bit too much festivity so far …. Not that I don't adore dinners and gossip and dances ; not that I do not love to pervade bright and glittering places."
  • (lb) A fess that has been modified to zig-zag across the center of a coat of arms from dexter to sinister.
  • A genre of modern music characterised by sampled beats, repetitive rhythms and few lyrics.
  • (lb) The art, profession, and study of dancing.
  • A piece of music with a particular dance rhythm.
  • *
  • *:They stayed together during three dances , went out on to the terrace, explored wherever they were permitted to explore, paid two visits to the buffet, and enjoyed themselves much in the same way as if they had been school-children surreptitiously breaking loose from an assembly of grown-ups.
  • Hyponyms

    * See also

    Derived terms

    * dance music * dirty dance * fan dance * line dance * * war dance

    Verb

    (danc)
  • To move with rhythmic steps or movements, especially in time to music.
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=4 , passage=“Well,” I answered, at first with uncertainty, then with inspiration, “he would do splendidly to lead your cotillon, if you think of having one.” ¶ “So you do not dance , Mr. Crocker?” ¶ I was somewhat set back by her perspicuity.}}
  • To leap or move lightly and rapidly.
  • * Byron
  • Shadows in the glassy waters dance .
  • To perform the steps to.
  • To cause to dance, or move nimbly or merrily about.
  • * (William Shakespeare)
  • to dance our ringlets to the whistling wind
  • * (William Shakespeare)
  • Thy grandsire loved thee well; / Many a time he danced thee on his knee.

    Derived terms

    * dance attendance * dancer * dirty dance * line dance

    See also

    * * acrobatics * ballet * ballroom * disco * foxtrot * hiphop * jazz * modern * musical theatre * tap dancing * terpsichorean

    Anagrams

    *

    References

    1000 English basic words ----