Berate vs Curse - What's the difference?

berate | curse |


As verbs the difference between berate and curse

is that berate is to chide or scold vehemently while curse is .

berate

English

Verb

(berat)
  • To chide or scold vehemently.
  • * 1896 , , Seats Of The Mighty , ch. 13:
  • Gabord, still muttering, turned to us again, and began to berate the soldiers for their laziness.
  • * 1914 , , The Gods of Mars , ch. 21:
  • A thousand times I berated myself for being drawn into such a trap as I might have known these pits easily could be.
  • * 1917 , , Jerry of the Islands , ch. 14:
  • Lenerengo, as usual, forgot everything else in the fiercer pleasure of berating her spouse.
  • * 2008 , Alex Perry, " The Man Who Would Be (Congo's) King," Time , 27 Nov.:
  • During the rally, he berates the crowd for their cowardice.
  • * 2011 , Tom Fordyce, Rugby World Cup 2011: England 12-19 France [http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/rugby_union/15210221.stm]
  • France were supposedly a team in pieces, beaten by Tonga just a week ago and with coach Marc Lievremont publicly berating his players, but so clear-cut was their victory that much of the atmosphere had been sucked from the contest long before the end.

    Synonyms

    * See also

    Anagrams

    * ----

    curse

    English

    Noun

    (wikipedia curse) (en noun)
  • A supernatural detriment or hindrance; a bane.
  • A prayer or imprecation that harm may befall someone.
  • The cause of great harm, evil, or misfortune; that which brings evil or severe affliction; torment.
  • * Shakespeare
  • The common curse of mankind, folly and ignorance.
  • A vulgar epithet.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-14, author= Sam Leith
  • , volume=189, issue=1, page=37, magazine=(The Guardian Weekly) , title= Where the profound meets the profane , passage=Swearing doesn't just mean what we now understand by "dirty words". It is entwined, in social and linguistic history, with the other sort of swearing: vows and oaths. Consider for a moment the origins of almost any word we have for bad language – "profanity", "curses ", "oaths" and "swearing" itself.}}
  • (slang) A woman's menses.
  • Derived terms

    * curse of Scotland

    Verb

  • (lb) To place a curse upon (a person or object).
  • *
  • *:Captain Edward Carlisle; he could not tell what this prisoner might do. He cursed' the fate which had assigned such a duty, ' cursed especially that fate which forced a gallant soldier to meet so superb a woman as this under handicap so hard.
  • To call upon divine or supernatural power to send injury upon; to imprecate evil upon; to execrate.
  • *Bible, (w) xxii. 28
  • *:Thou shalt notcurse the ruler of thy people.
  • (lb) To speak or shout a vulgar curse or epithet.
  • (lb) To use offensive or morally inappropriate language.
  • *Bible, (w) xxi. 74
  • *:Then began he to curse and to swear.
  • *(William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)
  • *:His spirits hear me, / And yet I need must curse .
  • To bring great evil upon; to be the cause of serious harm or unhappiness to; to furnish with that which will be a cause of deep trouble; to afflict or injure grievously; to harass or torment.
  • *(Alexander Pope) (1688-1744)
  • *:On impious realms and barbarous kings impose / Thy plagues, and curse 'em with such sons as those.
  • Synonyms

    * (sense) swear

    Antonyms

    * bless

    Anagrams

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