Frushed vs Crushed - What's the difference?

frushed | crushed |


As verbs the difference between frushed and crushed

is that frushed is (frush) while crushed is (crush).

As an adjective crushed is

pulverized, rendered into small, disconnected fragments.

frushed

English

Verb

(head)
  • (frush)

  • frush

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) fruissier, (froissier) ( > French froisser), from .

    Verb

    (es)
  • (obsolete) To break up, smash.
  • * 1600 , Edward Fairfax, The Jerusalem Delivered of Tasso, Book VIII, xlviii:
  • Rinaldo's armor frush'd and hack'd they had,
  • *:: Oft pierced through, with blood besmeared new.
  • * 1602 , ,
  • ... I like thy armour well;
    I'll frush it and unlock the rivets all
    But I'll be master of it.
  • (obsolete) To charge, rush violently.
  • * 1485 , Sir Thomas Malory, Le Morte Darthur , Book V:
  • And than they fruyshed forth all at onys, of the bourelyest knyghtes that ever brake brede, with mo than fyve hondred at the formyst frunte [...].
  • (historical) To straighten up (the feathers on an arrow).
  • Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • Easily broken; brittle; crisp.
  • Noun

  • (obsolete) noise; clatter; crash
  • (Southey)

    Etymology 2

    Compare Old English frosch, (frosk), a frog (the animal), (etyl) .

    Noun

    (es)
  • The frog of a horse's foot.
  • A discharge of a foetid or ichorous matter from the frog of a horse's foot; thrush.
  • (Webster 1913) ----

    crushed

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (crush)
  • Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • Pulverized, rendered into small, disconnected fragments.
  • Broken, saddened, depressed.
  • * , chapter=7
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=[…] St.?Bede's at this period of its history was perhaps the poorest and most miserable parish in the East End of London. Close-packed, crushed by the buttressed height of the railway viaduct, rendered airless by huge walls of factories, it at once banished lively interest from a stranger's mind and left only a dull oppression of the spirit.}}
  • (not comparable, textiles) Of a fabric, having the appearance of having been crushed.
  • Derived terms

    * crushed sugar * crushed velvet