Waft vs Cruise - What's the difference?

waft | cruise | Related terms |

Waft is a related term of cruise.


As a verb waft

is (ergative) to (cause to) float easily or gently through the air.

As a noun waft

is a light breeze.

As a proper noun cruise is

.

waft

English

Verb

(en verb)
  • (ergative) To (cause to) float easily or gently through the air.
  • * A breeze came in through the open window and wafted her sensuous perfume into my eager nostrils.
  • * 1922 , (James Joyce), Chapter 13
  • Through the open window of the church the fragrant incense was wafted and with it the fragrant names of her who was conceived without stain of original sin…
  • * 1914 , Hugh G. Evelyn-White’s translation of Hymn to Aphrodite from the .[http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Perseus%3Atext%3A1999.01.0138%3Ahymn%3D6]
  • There the moist breath of the western wind wafted her over the waves of the loud-moaning sea in soft foam, and there the gold-filleted Hours welcomed her joyously.
  • To be moved, or to pass, on a buoyant medium; to float.
  • * Dryden
  • And now the shouts waft near the citadel.
  • To give notice to by waving something; to wave the hand to; to beckon.
  • * Shakespeare
  • But soft: who wafts us yonder?

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A light breeze.
  • Something (a scent or odor), such as a perfume, that is carried through the air.
  • * 1908 ,
  • Meanwhile, the wafts from his old home pleaded, whispered, conjured, and finally claimed him imperiously.
  • * 2010 September, "The SLM'' Calendar", , ISSN 1090-5723, volume 16, issue 9, page 170:
  • Patrol Magazine says of this Oxford, Miss., band: "Guitars are responsible for every noise in Colour Revolt's mix—not a single note of piano, waft of synthesizer, or evidence of electronic tampering are to be found."
  • (nautical) A flag, (also called a waif or wheft), used to indicate wind direction or, with a knot tied in the center, as a signal.
  • cruise

    English

    Alternative forms

    * cruize

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A sea or lake voyage, especially one taken for pleasure.
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=4 , passage=Judge Short had gone to town, and Farrar was off for a three days' cruise up the lake. I was bitterly regretting I had not gone with him when the distant notes of a coach horn reached my ear, and I descried a four-in-hand winding its way up the inn road from the direction of Mohair.}}

    Derived terms

    * cruise control * cruise missile * cruise ship * cruiser * cruisey/cruisy * cruisewear * pleasure cruise

    Verb

    (cruis)
  • (lb) To sail about, especially for pleasure.
  • *
  • *:He and Gerald usually challenged the rollers in a sponson canoe when Gerald was there for the weekend; or, when Lansing came down, the two took long swims seaward or cruised about in Gerald's dory, clad in their swimming-suits; and Selwyn's youth became renewed in a manner almost ridiculous,.
  • (lb) To travel at constant speed for maximum operating efficiency.
  • (lb) To move about an area leisurely in the hope of discovering something, or looking for custom.
  • To actively seek a romantic partner or casual sexual partner by moving about a particular area; to troll.
  • To walk while holding on to an object (stage in development of ambulation, typically occurring at 10 months).
  • To win easily and convincingly.
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  • Derived terms

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    Anagrams

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