Crucifixion vs Passion - What's the difference?

crucifixion | passion |


As nouns the difference between crucifixion and passion

is that crucifixion is an execution by being nailed or tied to an upright cross and left to hang there until dead while passion is any great, strong, powerful emotion, especially romantic love or hate.

As a verb passion is

(obsolete) to suffer pain or sorrow; to experience a passion; to be extremely agitated.

crucifixion

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • An execution by being nailed or tied to an upright cross and left to hang there until dead.
  • ''Rome used crucifixions as a deterrent, and standard for the 'vilest' crimes, such as slave rebellion.
  • (absolute use, often capitalized: The Crucifixion ) The death on the Cross of Christ.
  • (figuratively) An ordeal, terrible, especially malicious treatment imposed upon someone.
  • ''The suspects' hostile interrogation amounted to a public crucifixion .

    passion

    English

    Noun

  • Any great, strong, powerful emotion, especially romantic love or hate.
  • We share a passion for books.
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2011 , date=January 16 , author=Saj Chowdhury , title=Sunderland 1 - 1 Newcastle , work=BBC citation , page= , passage=That was partly because of a swirling wind that made precision passing difficult and also a derby atmosphere where the emphasis seemed to be on passion rather than football.}}
  • Fervor, determination.
  • An object of passionate or romantic love or strong romantic interest.
  • It started as a hobby, but now my motorbike collection has become my passion .
  • sexual intercourse, especially when very emotional
  • We shared a night of passion .
  • The suffering of Jesus leading up to and during his crucifixion.
  • A play, musical composition or display meant to commemorate the suffering of Jesus.
  • (obsolete) Suffering or enduring of imposed or inflicted pain; any suffering or distress.
  • a cardiac passion
  • * Wyclif Bible (Rom. viii. 18)
  • the passions of this time
  • (obsolete) The state of being acted upon; subjection to an external agent or influence; a passive condition; opposed to action .
  • * John Locke
  • A body at rest affords us no idea of any active power to move, and, when set is motion, it is rather a passion than an action in it.
  • (obsolete) Capacity of being affected by external agents; susceptibility of impressions from external agents.
  • * Francis Bacon
  • mouldable and not mouldable, scissible and not scissible, and many other passions of matter
  • (obsolete) An innate quality, property, or attribute of a thing.
  • to obtain the knowledge of some passion of the circle. (rfex)
  • (obsolete) Disorder of the mind; madness.
  • (Shakespeare)

    Synonyms

    * ardor, fire in the belly, zeal

    Derived terms

    * passionflower * passion fruit, passionfruit * Passion Sunday * pash * passion pop

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (obsolete) To suffer pain or sorrow; to experience a passion; to be extremely agitated.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Dumbly she passions , frantically she doteth.
  • To give a passionate character to.
  • (Keats)

    References

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