Crowdest vs Crownest - What's the difference?

crowdest | crownest |


In archaic|lang=en terms the difference between crowdest and crownest

is that crowdest is (archaic) (crowd) while crownest is (archaic) (crown).

As verbs the difference between crowdest and crownest

is that crowdest is (archaic) (crowd) while crownest is (archaic) (crown).

crowdest

English

Verb

(head)
  • (archaic) (crowd)

  • crowd

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) . Cognate with Dutch kruien.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To press forward; to advance by pushing.
  • The man crowded into the packed room.
  • To press together or collect in numbers; to swarm; to throng.
  • They crowded through the archway and into the park.
  • * Addison:
  • The whole company crowded about the fire.
  • * Macaulay:
  • Images came crowding on his mind faster than he could put them into words.
  • To press or drive together, especially into a small space; to cram.
  • He tried to crowd too many cows into the cow-pen.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Crowd us and crush us.
  • To fill by pressing or thronging together.
  • * Prescott
  • The balconies and verandas were crowded with spectators, anxious to behold their future sovereign.
  • To push, to press, to shove.
  • tried to crowd her off the sidewalk
  • * 2006 , Lanna Nakone, Every Child Has a Thinking Style (ISBN 0399532463), page 73:
  • Alexis's mementos and numerous dance trophies were starting to crowd her out of her little bedroom.
  • (nautical) To approach another ship too closely when it has right of way.
  • To carry excessive sail in the hope of moving faster.
  • To press by solicitation; to urge; to dun; hence, to treat discourteously or unreasonably.
  • Derived terms
    * crowd control * crowd manipulation * crowd out * crowd psychology * crowd sail

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A group of people congregated or collected into a close body without order.
  • :
  • *
  • *:Athelstan Arundel walked homeHe walked the whole way, walking through crowds , and under the noses of dray-horses, carriage-horses, and cart-horses, without taking the least notice of them.
  • *
  • *:He tried to persuade Cicely to stay away from the ball-room for a fourth dance.she found her mother standing up before the seat on which she had sat all the evening searching anxiously for her with her eyes, and her father by her side.
  • Several things collected or closely pressed together; also, some things adjacent to each other.
  • :
  • (lb) The so-called lower orders of people; the populace, vulgar.
  • * (1809-1892)
  • *:To fool the crowd with glorious lies.
  • *(John Dryden) (1631-1700)
  • *:He went not with the crowd to see a shrine.
  • A group of people united or at least characterised by a common interest.
  • :
  • Synonyms
    * (group of things) aggregation, cluster, group, mass * (group of people) audience, group, multitude, public, swarm, throng * (the "lower orders" of people) everyone, general public, masses, rabble, mob, unwashed
    Derived terms
    * crowd catch * crowd-pleaser * crowd-puller * work the crowd

    Etymology 2

    Celtic, from Welsh crwth.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete) A crwth, an Ancient Celtic plucked string instrument.
  • * Ben Jonson
  • A lackey that can warble upon a crowd a little.
  • (now dialectal) A fiddle.
  • * 1819': wandering palmers, hedge-priests, Saxon minstrels, and Welsh bards, were muttering prayers, and extracting mistuned dirges from their harps, '''crowds , and rotes. — Walter Scott, ''Ivanhoe
  • * 1684': That keep their consciences in cases, / As fiddlers do with ' crowds and bases — Samuel Butler, "Hudibras"
  • Verb

    (en verb)
  • (obsolete) To play on a crowd; to fiddle.
  • * Massinger
  • Fiddlers, crowd on.

    References

    (Webster 1913)

    Anagrams

    *

    crownest

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (archaic) (crown)

  • crown

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) coroune, curune, (etyl) corone (French couronne), from (etyl)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A royal, imperial or princely headdress; a diadem.
  • (heraldry) A representation of such a headdress, as in heraldry; it may even be that only the image exists, no physical crown, as in the case of the kingdom of Belgium; by analogy such crowns can be awarded to moral persons that don't even have a head, as the mural crown for cities in heraldry
  • A wreath or band for the head, especially one given as reward of victory or a mark of honor.
  • (label) Any reward of victory or a mark of honor.
  • Imperial or regal power, or those who wield it.
  • The sovereign (in a monarchy), as head of state.
  • * Blackstone
  • Parliament may be dissolved by the demise of the crown .
  • The state, the government (headed by a monarch).
  • Treasure recovered from shipwrecks automatically becomes property of the Crown .
  • * Macaulay
  • Large arrears of pay were due to the civil and military servants of the crown .
  • The topmost part of the head.
  • * Shakespeare
  • From toe to crown he'll fill our skin with pinches.
  • * Bunyan
  • Twenty things which I set down: / This done, I twenty more had in my crown .
  • The highest part of a hill.
  • * Dryden
  • the steepy crown of the bare mountains
  • The top section of a hat, above the brim.
  • The raised centre of a road.
  • The highest part of an arch.
  • Splendor; culmination; acme.
  • * Milton
  • mutual love, the crown of all our bliss
  • Any currency (originally) issued by the crown (regal power) and often bearing a crown (headdress); (translation) various currencies known by similar names in their native languages, such as the koruna, kruna, krone
  • # (historical) Particularly, a former pre-decimalization British coin worth five shillings.
  • #*1859 ,
  • #*:Half-a-crown'' is known as an (alderman), (half a bull), (half a tusheroon), and a (madza caroon); whilst a ''crown'' piece, or ''five shillings , may be called either a (bull), or a (caroon), or a (cartwheel), or a (coachwheel), or a (thick-un), or a (tusheroon).
  • (botany) The part of a plant where the root and stem meet.
  • (forestry) The top of a tree.
  • (anatomy) The part of a tooth above the gums.
  • (dentistry) A prosthetic covering for a tooth.
  • (nautical) A knot formed in the end of a rope by tucking in the strands to prevent them from unravelling
  • (nautical) The part of an anchor where the arms and the shank meet
  • (nautical) The rounding, or rounded part, of the deck from a level line.
  • (nautical, in the plural) The bights formed by the turns of a cable.
  • (Totten)
  • (paper) A standard size of printing paper measuring 20 inches x 15 inches.
  • (chemistry) A monocyclic ligand having three or more binding sites, capable of holding a guest in a central location
  • (medical) During childbirth, the appearance of the baby's head from the mother's vagina
  • * 2007 , David Schottke, American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, First Responder: Your First Response in Emergency Care , page 385
  • You will see the baby's head crowning during contractions, at which time you must prepare to assist the mother in the delivery of the baby.
  • (firearms) A rounding or smoothing of the barrel opening
  • The upper range of facets in a rose diamond.
  • The dome of a furnace.
  • (geometry) The area enclosed between two concentric perimeters.
  • (religion) A round spot shaved clean on the top of the head, as a mark of the clerical state; the tonsure.
  • A whole turkey with the legs and wings removed to produce a joint of white meat.
  • (African-American colloquialism) A formal hat worn by women to Sunday church services; elliptical for church crown.
  • *2013 , Adam Boulton, Tony's Ten Years: Memories of the Blair Administration'' [https://books.google.com/books?id=N0EeXxOiiCoC&pg=PT305&dq=%22church+crown%22+sunday+hat&hl=en&sa=X&ei=TxjmVPjaH4fgywPR9YBA&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q=%22church%20crown%22%20sunday%20hat&f=false]
  • *:"His [Barack Obama's] unofficial slogan 'fired up and ready to go!' was borrowed from an 'old lady in a church crown [Sunday best hat]."
  • Synonyms
    * (reward of victory or a mark of honor) award, garland, honor/honour, prize, wreath * coronet * (representation of such a headdress) * (wreath or band for the head) garland, wreath * (imperial or regal power) monarchy, royalty * (of the head) apex, top * (of a hill) apex, peak, summit, top * (centre of a road) * (highest part of an arch) * (of a hat) top * completion, culmination, finish, splendor/splendour * (currency) * (British coin) caser, tusheroon, tush, tosheroon, tosh, bull, caroon, thick-un, coachwheel, cartwheel * (part of plant) * corona *
    Antonyms
    * (of a hill) base, bottom, foot
    Derived terms
    * crown achievement * crown cactus * crown colony * Crown Court * crowned pigeon * crown estate * crown ether * crown fire * crown flower * crown gall * crown grafting * crown green * crown green bowls * crown lands * crown mammal * crown jewels, Crown Jewels * crown of thorns * crown prince * crown princess * crown ward * crown wheel * firecrown * forecrown * half-crown * nanocrown * plea of the crown * triple crown

    Adjective

    (-)
  • Of, related to, or pertaining to a crown.
  • crown prince
  • Of, related to, pertaining to the top of a tree or trees.
  • a crown fire

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To place a crown on the head of.
  • To formally declare (someone) a king, queen, emperor, etc.
  • * Dryden
  • Her who fairest does appear, / Crown her queen of all the year.
  • To bestow something upon as a mark of honour, dignity, or recompense; to adorn; to dignify.
  • * Bible, Psalms viii. 5
  • Thou hast crowned him with glory and honour.
  • To form the topmost or finishing part of; to complete; to consummate; to perfect.
  • * Byron
  • the grove that crowns yon tufted hill
  • * Motley
  • To crown the whole, came a proposition.
  • To declare (someone) a winner.
  • * {{quote-news, year=2011, date=October 23, author=Tom Fordyce
  • , title=2011 Rugby World Cup final: New Zealand 8-7 France, work=BBC Sport citation , passage=New Zealand were crowned world champions for the first time in 24 years after squeezing past an inspired France team by a single point.}}
  • (medicine) Of a baby, during the birthing process; for the surface of the baby's head to appear in the vaginal opening.
  • To cause to round upward; to make anything higher at the middle than at the edges, such as the face of a machine pulley.
  • To hit on the head.
  • * {{quote-book, year=1963, author=(Margery Allingham), title=(The China Governess)
  • , chapter=6 citation , passage=&lquo;[…] I remember a lady coming to inspect St. Mary's Home where I was brought up and seeing us all in our lovely Elizabethan uniforms we were so proud of, and bursting into tears all over us because “it was wicked to dress us like charity children”. We nearly crowned her we were so offended. She saw us but she didn't know us, did she?’.}}
  • (video games) To shoot an opponent in the back of the head with a shotgun in a first-person shooter video game.
  • (board games) In checkers, to stack two checkers to indicate that the piece has become a king.
  • (firearms) To widen the opening of the barrel.
  • (military) To effect a lodgment upon, as upon the crest of the glacis, or the summit of the breach.
  • (nautical) To lay the ends of the strands of (a knot) over and under each other.
  • Derived terms
    * crowned

    See also

    * coronation

    Etymology 2

    Verb

    (head)
  • (obsolete)
  • * Byron
  • The cock had crown .
    English irregular past participles