Slams vs Criticism - What's the difference?

slams | criticism |


As a verb slams

is (slam).

As a noun criticism is

the act of criticising; a critical judgment passed or expressed; a critical observation or detailed examination and review; a critique; animadversion; censure.

slams

English

Verb

(head)
  • (slam)
  • ----

    slam

    English

    Etymology 1

    Apparently from a Scandinavian source; compare Norwegian slamre, Swedish slemma.

    Verb

    (slamm)
  • (ergative) To shut with sudden force so as to produce a shock and noise.
  • Don't slam the door!
  • (ergative) To put in or on a particular place with force and loud noise. (Often followed by a preposition such as down'', ''against'' or into.)
  • Don't slam that trunk down on the pavement!
  • To strike forcefully with some implement.
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2011 , date=January 18 , author= , title=Wolverhampton 5 - 0 Doncaster , work=BBC citation , page= , passage=But Wolves went in front when Steven Fletcher headed in Stephen Hunt's cross and it was 2-0 when Geoffrey Mujangi Bia slammed in his first for the club. }}
  • (colloquial) To speak badly of; to criticize forcefully.
  • Don't ever slam me in front of the boss like that again!
    Union leaders slammed the new proposals.
    Critics slammed the new film, calling it violent and meaningless.
  • (basketball) To dunk forcefully, to slam dunk.
  • (bridge) To make a slam bid.
  • (card games) To defeat (opponents at cards) by winning all the tricks of a deal or a hand.
  • (Hoyle)
  • to change providers (e.g. of domain registration or telephone carrier) for a customer without clear (if any) consent.
  • to drink off, to drink quickly
  • to compete in a poetry slam
  • Synonyms
    * (drink quickly) See also
    Derived terms
    * slam the door on * slam on the brakes

    Noun

  • (countable) A sudden impact or blow.
  • (countable) The shock and noise produced by violently closing a door or other object.
  • * (Charles Dickens)
  • The slam and the scowl were lost upon Sam.
  • (countable, basketball) A slam dunk.
  • (countable, colloquial, US) An insult.
  • *, chapter=5
  • , title= Mr. Pratt's Patients , passage=“Well,” I says, “I cal'late a body could get used to Tophet if he stayed there long enough.” ¶ She flared up; the least mite of a slam at Doctor Wool was enough to set her going.}}
  • (uncountable) The yellow iron silicate produced in alum works as a waste product.
  • A poetry slam.
  • (UK, dialect) The refuse of alum works.
  • Etymology 2

    Origin unknown.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete) A type of card game, also called ruff and honours.
  • (cards) Losing or winning all the tricks in a game.
  • (countable, bridge) A bid of six (small slam'') or seven (''grand slam ) in a suit or no trump.
  • Derived terms
    * grand slam

    Verb

    (slamm)
  • (card games) To defeat by winning all the tricks of a deal or a hand.
  • Anagrams

    * English ergative verbs ----

    criticism

    Noun

  • The act of criticising; a critical judgment passed or expressed; a critical observation or detailed examination and review; a critique; animadversion; censure.
  • The politician received a lot of public criticism for his controversial stance on the issue.
  • * {{quote-book, year=1874, author=Thomas Hardy, title=Far From the Madding Crowd, publisher=Barnes & Noble Classics (2005 publication of 1912 Wessex edition), page=276,
  • passage=Her attitude was that of a person who listens, either to the external world of sound, or to the discourse of thought. A close criticism might have detected signs proving that she was intent on the latter alternative.}}

    Derived terms

    * self-criticism * constructive criticism * destructive criticism * literary criticism

    References

    * *