Squeeze vs Crimp - What's the difference?

squeeze | crimp | Related terms |

Squeeze is a related term of crimp.


As verbs the difference between squeeze and crimp

is that squeeze is to apply pressure to from two or more sides at once while crimp is to fasten by bending metal so that it squeezes around the parts to be fastened or crimp can be to impress (seamen or soldiers); to entrap, to decoy.

As nouns the difference between squeeze and crimp

is that squeeze is a difficult position while crimp is a fastener or a fastening method that secures parts by bending metal around a joint and squeezing it together, often with a tool that adds indentations to capture the parts or crimp can be an agent making it his business to procure seamen, soldiers, etc, especially by seducing, decoying, entrapping, or impressing them [since the passing of the merchant shipping act of 1854, applied to one who infringes sub-section 1 of this act, ie to a person other than the owner, master, etc, who engages seamen without a license from the board of trade].

As an adjective crimp is

(obsolete) easily crumbled; friable; brittle.

squeeze

English

Verb

(squeez)
  • To apply pressure to from two or more sides at once
  • I squeezed the ball between my hands.
    Please don't squeeze the toothpaste tube in the middle.
  • * 1922 , (Virginia Woolf), (w, Jacob's Room) Chapter 1
  • "Over there—by the rock," Steele muttered, with his brush between his teeth, squeezing out raw sienna, and keeping his eyes fixed on Betty Flanders's back.
  • (ambitransitive) To fit into a tight place
  • I managed to squeeze the car into that parking space.
    Can you squeeze through that gap?
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2010 , date=December 29 , author=Sam Sheringham , title=Liverpool 0 - 1 Wolverhampton , work=BBC citation , page= , passage=It was an omen of things to come as in the 56th minute the visitors took the lead after a mix-up between Skrtel and Sotirios Kyrgiakos allowed Ebanks-Blake's through-ball to squeeze between them.}}
  • * 1908 ,
  • Could he not squeeze under the seat of a carriage? He had seen this method adopted by schoolboys, when the journey- money provided by thoughtful parents had been diverted to other and better ends.
  • To remove something with difficulty, or apparent difficulty
  • He squeezed some money out of his wallet.
  • To put in a difficult position by presenting two or more choices
  • I'm being squeezed between my job and my volunteer work.
  • * 2013 May 23, , " British Leader’s Liberal Turn Sets Off a Rebellion in His Party," New York Times (retrieved 29 May 2013):
  • At a time when Mr. Cameron is being squeezed from both sides — from the right by members of his own party and by the anti-immigrant, anti-Europe U.K. Independence Party, and from the left by his Liberal Democrat coalition partners — the move seemed uncharacteristically clunky.
  • (figurative) To oppress with hardships, burdens, or taxes; to harass.
  • * L'Estrange
  • In a civil war, people must expect to be crushed and squeezed toward the burden.
  • (baseball) To attempt to score a runner from third by bunting
  • Jones squeezed in Smith with a perfect bunt.

    Derived terms

    (terms derived from the verb "squeeze") * squeezable * squeezebox * squeeze in * squeeze out * squeezer * squeezy * unsqueeze

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A difficult position
  • I'm in a tight squeeze right now when it comes to my free time.
  • A traversal of a narrow passage
  • It was a tight squeeze , but I got through to the next section of the cave.
  • A hug or other affectionate grasp
  • a gentle squeeze on the arm
  • (slang) A romantic partner
  • I want to be your main squeeze
  • (baseball) The act of bunting in an attempt to score a runner from third
  • The game ended in exciting fashion with a failed squeeze .
  • (epigraphy) An impression of an inscription formed by pressing wet paper onto the surface and peeling off when dry.
  • The light not being good enough for photography, I took a squeeze of the stone.
  • (card games) A play that forces an opponent to discard a card that gives up one or more tricks.
  • (archaic) A bribe or fee paid to a middleman, especially in China.
  • See also

    * squash * squeegee * squish * margin squeeze

    crimp

    English

    Etymology 1

    (etyl) crempen, from (etyl) . Germanic etymology. Cognate to Dutch krimpen, via Middle Dutch crimpen, to Low German crimpen, Origins, p. 130, by Eric Partridge and to Faroese . From or cognate to Old Norse kreppa. Possible cognate to cramp.

    Adjective

  • (obsolete) Easily crumbled; friable; brittle.
  • * J. Philips
  • Now the fowler treads the crimp earth.
  • (obsolete) Weak; inconsistent; contradictory.
  • * Arbuthnot
  • The evidence is crimp ; the witnesses swear backward and forward, and contradict themselves.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A fastener or a fastening method that secures parts by bending metal around a joint and squeezing it together, often with a tool that adds indentations to capture the parts.
  • The strap was held together by a simple metal crimp .
  • (obsolete, UK, dialect) A coal broker.
  • (De Foe)
  • (obsolete) One who decoys or entraps men into the military or naval service.
  • (Marryat)
  • (obsolete) A keeper of a low lodging house where sailors and emigrants are entrapped and fleeced.
  • (usually, in the plural) A hairstyle which has been crimped, or shaped so it bends back and forth in many short kinks.
  • (obsolete) A card game.
  • (Ben Jonson)

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To fasten by bending metal so that it squeezes around the parts to be fastened.
  • He crimped the wire in place.
  • To pinch and hold; to seize.
  • To style hair into a crimp.
  • To join the edges of food products. For example: Cornish pasty, pies, jiaozi, Jamaican patty, and sealed crustless sandwiches.
  • Etymology 2

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • An agent making it his business to procure seamen, soldiers, etc., especially by seducing, decoying, entrapping, or impressing them. [Since the passing of the Merchant Shipping Act of 1854, applied to one who infringes sub-section 1 of this Act, i.e. to a person other than the owner, master, etc., who engages seamen without a license from the Board of Trade.]
  • * (rfdate)
  • When a master of a ship..has lost any of his hands, he applies to a crimp ..who makes it his business to seduce the men belonging to some other ship.
  • * (rfdate)
  • Trepanned into the West India Company's service by the crimps or silver-coopers as a common soldier.
  • * (rfdate)
  • Offering three guineas ahead to the crimps for every good able seaman.
  • * (rfdate)
  • I hear there are plenty of good men stowed away by the crimps at different places.
  • * (rfdate)
  • Sallying forth at night..he came near being carried off by a gang of crimps .
  • * (rfdate)
  • In the high and palmy days of the crimp , the pirate, the press-gang.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To impress (seamen or soldiers); to entrap, to decoy.
  • Coaxing and courting with intent to crimp him. — Carlyle.
  • * (rfdate)
  • Plundering corn and crimping recruits.
  • * (rfdate)
  • Clutching at him, to crimp him or impress him.
  • * (rfdate)
  • The cruel folly which crimps a number of ignorant and innocent peasants, dresses them up in uniform..and sends them off to kill and be killed.
  • * (rfdate)
  • The Egyptian Government crimped negroes in the streets of Cairo.
  • * (rfdate)
  • Why not create customers in the Queen's dominions..instead of trying..to crimp them in other countries?

    References

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