Coil vs Crimp - What's the difference?

coil | crimp | Related terms |

Coil is a related term of crimp.


As nouns the difference between coil and crimp

is that coil is something wound in the form of a helix or spiral or coil can be a noise, tumult, bustle, or turmoil while crimp is a fastener or a fastening method that secures parts by bending metal around a joint and squeezing it together, often with a tool that adds indentations to capture the parts or crimp can be an agent making it his business to procure seamen, soldiers, etc, especially by seducing, decoying, entrapping, or impressing them [since the passing of the merchant shipping act of 1854, applied to one who infringes sub-section 1 of this act, ie to a person other than the owner, master, etc, who engages seamen without a license from the board of trade].

As verbs the difference between coil and crimp

is that coil is to wind or reel eg a wire or rope into regular rings, often around a centerpiece while crimp is to fasten by bending metal so that it squeezes around the parts to be fastened or crimp can be to impress (seamen or soldiers); to entrap, to decoy.

As an adjective crimp is

(obsolete) easily crumbled; friable; brittle.

coil

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) ; compare legend.

Noun

(en noun)
  • Something wound in the form of a helix or spiral.
  • the sinuous coils of a snake
  • * Washington Irving
  • The wild grapevines that twisted their coils from tree to tree.
  • Any intra-uterine contraceptive device (Abbreviation: IUD )—the first IUDs were coil-shaped.
  • (electrical) A coil of electrically conductive wire through which electricity can flow.
  • (figurative) Entanglement; perplexity.
  • Synonyms
    * (coil of conductive wire) inductor
    Derived terms
    * coil spring * impedance coil * mosquito coil * Oudin coil * Tesla coil

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To wind or reel e.g. a wire or rope into regular rings, often around a centerpiece.
  • A simple transformer can be made by coiling two pieces of insulated copper wire around an iron heart.
  • To wind into loops (roughly) around a common center.
  • The sailor coiled the free end of the hawser on the pier.
  • To wind cylindrically or spirally.
  • to coil a rope when not in use
    The snake coiled itself before springing.
  • (obsolete, rare) To encircle and hold with, or as if with, coils.
  • Etymology 2

    Origin unknown.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A noise, tumult, bustle, or turmoil.
  • * 1594 , William Shakespeare, Titus Andronicus , Act III:
  • If the windes rage, doth not the Sea wax mad, / Threatning the welkin with his big-swolne face? / And wilt thou haue a reason for this coile ?
  • * 1624 , John Smith, Generall Historie , in Kupperman 1988, p. 162:
  • this great Savage desired also to see him. A great coyle there was to set him forward.
  • * 1704 , Jonathan Swift, A Tale of a Tub :
  • they continued so extremely fond of gold, that if Peter sent them abroad, though it were only upon a compliment, they would roar, and spit, and belch, and piss, and f—t, and snivel out fire, and keep a perpetual coil , till you flung them a bit of gold [...].
    Derived terms
    * mortal coil

    Anagrams

    * ----

    crimp

    English

    Etymology 1

    (etyl) crempen, from (etyl) . Germanic etymology. Cognate to Dutch krimpen, via Middle Dutch crimpen, to Low German crimpen, Origins, p. 130, by Eric Partridge and to Faroese . From or cognate to Old Norse kreppa. Possible cognate to cramp.

    Adjective

  • (obsolete) Easily crumbled; friable; brittle.
  • * J. Philips
  • Now the fowler treads the crimp earth.
  • (obsolete) Weak; inconsistent; contradictory.
  • * Arbuthnot
  • The evidence is crimp ; the witnesses swear backward and forward, and contradict themselves.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A fastener or a fastening method that secures parts by bending metal around a joint and squeezing it together, often with a tool that adds indentations to capture the parts.
  • The strap was held together by a simple metal crimp .
  • (obsolete, UK, dialect) A coal broker.
  • (De Foe)
  • (obsolete) One who decoys or entraps men into the military or naval service.
  • (Marryat)
  • (obsolete) A keeper of a low lodging house where sailors and emigrants are entrapped and fleeced.
  • (usually, in the plural) A hairstyle which has been crimped, or shaped so it bends back and forth in many short kinks.
  • (obsolete) A card game.
  • (Ben Jonson)

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To fasten by bending metal so that it squeezes around the parts to be fastened.
  • He crimped the wire in place.
  • To pinch and hold; to seize.
  • To style hair into a crimp.
  • To join the edges of food products. For example: Cornish pasty, pies, jiaozi, Jamaican patty, and sealed crustless sandwiches.
  • Etymology 2

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • An agent making it his business to procure seamen, soldiers, etc., especially by seducing, decoying, entrapping, or impressing them. [Since the passing of the Merchant Shipping Act of 1854, applied to one who infringes sub-section 1 of this Act, i.e. to a person other than the owner, master, etc., who engages seamen without a license from the Board of Trade.]
  • * (rfdate)
  • When a master of a ship..has lost any of his hands, he applies to a crimp ..who makes it his business to seduce the men belonging to some other ship.
  • * (rfdate)
  • Trepanned into the West India Company's service by the crimps or silver-coopers as a common soldier.
  • * (rfdate)
  • Offering three guineas ahead to the crimps for every good able seaman.
  • * (rfdate)
  • I hear there are plenty of good men stowed away by the crimps at different places.
  • * (rfdate)
  • Sallying forth at night..he came near being carried off by a gang of crimps .
  • * (rfdate)
  • In the high and palmy days of the crimp , the pirate, the press-gang.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To impress (seamen or soldiers); to entrap, to decoy.
  • Coaxing and courting with intent to crimp him. — Carlyle.
  • * (rfdate)
  • Plundering corn and crimping recruits.
  • * (rfdate)
  • Clutching at him, to crimp him or impress him.
  • * (rfdate)
  • The cruel folly which crimps a number of ignorant and innocent peasants, dresses them up in uniform..and sends them off to kill and be killed.
  • * (rfdate)
  • The Egyptian Government crimped negroes in the streets of Cairo.
  • * (rfdate)
  • Why not create customers in the Queen's dominions..instead of trying..to crimp them in other countries?

    References

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