Crash vs Kip - What's the difference?

crash | kip | Synonyms |

Crash is a synonym of kip.


As nouns the difference between crash and kip

is that crash is an automobile, airplane, or other vehicle accident or crash can be (fibre) plain linen while kip is the untanned of a young or small beast, such as a calf, lamb, or young goat or kip can be (informal|chiefly uk) a place to sleep; a rooming house; a bed or kip can be a unit of force equal to 1000 pounds-force (lbf) (444822 kilonewtons or 444822 newtons); occasionally called the kilopound or kip can be the unit of currency in laos, divided into 100 att, symbol , abbreviation lak or kip can be (gymnastics) a basic skill or maneuver in used, for example, as a way of mounting the bar in a front support position, or achieving a handstand from a hanging position in its basic form, the legs are swung forward and upward by bending the hips, then suddenly down again, which gives the upward impulse to the body.

As verbs the difference between crash and kip

is that crash is to collide with something destructively, fall or come down violently while kip is (informal|chiefly uk) to sleep; often with the connotation of a temporary or charitable situation, or one borne out of necessity.

As a adjective crash

is quick, fast, intensive.

crash

English

(wikipedia crash)

Etymology 1

From (etyl) (m), (for form development compare (m), (m), (m)).

Noun

(es)
  • An automobile, airplane, or other vehicle accident.
  • She broke two bones in her body in a car crash .
    Nobody survived the plane crash
  • A computer malfunction that is caused by faulty software, and makes the system either partially or totally inoperable.
  • My computer had a crash so I had to reboot it.
  • A loud sound as made for example by cymbals.
  • The piece ended in a crescendo, building up to a crash of cymbals.
  • A sudden large decline of business or the prices of stocks (especially one that causes additional failures)
  • the stock market ''crash'''
  • A comedown of a drug.
  • A group of rhinoceroses.
  • * Patrick F. McManus, “Nincompoopery'' and Other Group Terms”, in ''The Grasshopper Trap , Henry Holt and Company, ISBN 0-8050-0111-5, page 103,
  • One of my favorites among the terms of groups of creatures is a crash''''' of rhinoceros. I can imagine an African guide saying to his client, “Shoot, dammit, shoot! Here comes the whole bloody ' crash of rhinoceros!”
    […] Personally, I think I’d just as soon come across a crash of rhinoceros as a knot of toad.
  • * 1998 , E. Melanie Watt, Black Rhinos , page 19
  • The largest group of black rhinos reported was made up of 13 individuals. A group of rhinos is called a crash .
  • * 1999 , Edward Osborne Wilson, The Diversity of Life , page 126
  • Out in the water a crash of rhinoceros-like animals browse belly deep through a bed of aquatic plants.
  • * 2003 , Claude Herve-Bazin, Judith Farr Kenya and Tanzania , page 23
  • The crash of rhinoceros at Tsavo now numbers almost 200.
  • dysphoria
  • Derived terms
    * crash and burn * crash course * crashpad * stock market crash

    Adjective

    (-)
  • quick, fast, intensive
  • crash course
    crash diet

    Verb

    (es)
  • To collide with something destructively, fall or come down violently.
  • To severely damage or destroy something by causing it to collide with something else.
  • I'm sorry for crashing the bike into a wall. I'll pay for repairs.
  • (slang) (via gatecrash) To attend a social event without invitation.
  • We weren't invited to the party so we decided to crash it.
  • (management) To accelerate a project or a task or its schedule by devoting more resources to it.
  • *
  • To make or experience informal temporary living arrangements.
  • Hey dude, can I crash at your pad?
  • (computing, software, intransitive) To terminate extraordinarily.
  • If the system crashes again, we'll have it fixed in the computer shop.
  • (computing, software, transitive) To cause to terminate extraordinarily.
  • Double-clicking this icon crashes the desktop.
  • To experience a period of depression and/or lethargy after a period of euphoria, as after the euphoric effect of a psychotropic drug has dissipated.
  • Etymology 2

    From (etyl) .

    Noun

    (-)
  • (fibre) Plain linen.
  • kip

    English

    Etymology 1

    1325–75, (etyl) kipp, from (etyl) kip, from (etyl)

    Alternative forms

    * kipp, kippe, kyppe

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The untanned of a young or small beast, such as a calf, lamb, or young goat.
  • A bundle or set of such hides.
  • (obsolete) A unit of count for skins, 30 for lamb and 50 for goat.
  • The leather made from such hide; kip leather .
  • Etymology 2

    1760–70, probably related to (etyl) . From the same distant Germanic root as (cove).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (informal, chiefly UK) A place to sleep; a rooming house; a bed.
  • (informal, chiefly UK) Sleep, snooze, nap, forty winks, doze.
  • I’m just going for my afternoon kip .
  • (informal, chiefly UK) A very untidy house or room.
  • (informal, chiefly UK, dated) A brothel.
  • Verb

    (kipp)
  • (informal, chiefly UK) To sleep; often with the connotation of a temporary or charitable situation, or one borne out of necessity.
  • Don’t worry, I’ll kip on the sofabed.
    Synonyms
    * crash (US)

    Etymology 3

    1910–15, Americanism, abbreviated from (kilo) + (pound).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A unit of force equal to 1000 pounds-force (lbf) (4.44822 kilonewtons or 4448.22 newtons); occasionally called the kilopound.
  • A unit of weight, used, for example, to calculate shipping charges, equal to half a US ton, or 1000 pounds.
  • (rare, nonstandard) A unit of mass equal to 1000 avoirdupois pounds.
  • Etymology 4

    1950–55, from (etyl) . (Lao kip)

    Noun

    (kip)
  • The unit of currency in Laos, divided into 100 att, symbol , abbreviation LAK.
  • (-)

    Etymology 5

    Unknown. Some senses maybe related to (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (gymnastics) A basic skill or maneuver in used, for example, as a way of mounting the bar in a front support position, or achieving a handstand from a hanging position. In its basic form, the legs are swung forward and upward by bending the hips, then suddenly down again, which gives the upward impulse to the body.
  • (Australia, games, two-up) A piece of flat wood used to throw the coins in a game of two-up.
  • * 1951 , , 1952, page 208,
  • Again Turk placed the pennies on the kip'. He took his time, deliberate over the small action, held the ' kip for a long breathless moment, then jerked his wrist and the pennies were in the air.
  • * 2003 , Gilbert Buchanan, Malco Polia - Traveller, Warrior , page 52,
  • Money was laid on the floor for bets on the heads'' or ''tails'' finish of two pennies tossed high into the air from a small wooden ''kip .
  • * 2010 , Colin McLaren, Sunflower: A Tale of Love, War and Intrigue , page 101,
  • Jack discarded a length of wood, two twists of wire, his two-up kip and a spanner.
  • A sharp-pointed hill; a projecting point, as on a hill.
  • Derived terms
    * kip-up

    Anagrams

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