Canny vs Cranny - What's the difference?

canny | cranny |


As adjectives the difference between canny and cranny

is that canny is careful, prudent, cautious while cranny is (uk|dialect) quick; giddy; thoughtless.

As a noun cranny is

a small, narrow opening, fissure, crevice, or chink, as in a wall, or other substance.

As a verb cranny is

to break into, or become full of, crannies.

canny

English

Adjective

(er)
  • Careful, prudent, cautious.
  • (Ramsay)
  • Knowing, shrewd, astute.
  • (Sir Walter Scott)
  • Frugal, thrifty.
  • (Scotland, Northumbria) Pleasant, fair.
  • She's a canny lass hor like!
  • * 1783 , (Robert Burns), "Green Grow the Rashes O", Songs and Ballads
  • But gie me a cannie hour at e'en,
    My arms about my dearie O;
    An' warl'y cares, an' warl'y men,
    Mae a' gae tapsalteerie O!
  • (Northumbria) Very or much.
  • That's a canny big horse, man!

    Derived terms

    * cannily * canniness

    References

    * * * *

    Anagrams

    * ----

    cranny

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) crany, .

    Noun

    (crannies)
  • A small, narrow opening, fissure, crevice, or chink, as in a wall, or other substance.
  • * Arbuthnot
  • He peeped into every cranny .
  • * Dryden
  • In a firm building, the cavities ought not to be filled with rubbish, but with brick or stone fitted to the crannies .
  • A tool for forming the necks of bottles, etc.
  • Verb

  • To break into, or become full of, crannies.
  • * Golding
  • The ground did cranny everywhere.
  • To haunt or enter by crannies.
  • * Byron
  • All tenantless, save to the crannying wind.

    Etymology 2

    Perhaps for cranky.

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • (UK, dialect) quick; giddy; thoughtless
  • (Halliwell)
    (Webster 1913)