Handle vs Crank - What's the difference?

handle | crank |


In lang=en terms the difference between handle and crank

is that handle is to use the hands while crank is to be running at a high level of output or effort.

In slang|lang=en terms the difference between handle and crank

is that handle is (slang) a name, nickname or pseudonym while crank is (slang) penis.

As nouns the difference between handle and crank

is that handle is a part of an object which is held in the hand when used or moved, as the haft of a sword, the knob of a door, the bail of a kettle, etc or handle can be (slang) a name, nickname or pseudonym while crank is a bent piece of an axle or shaft, or an attached arm perpendicular, or nearly so, to the end of a shaft or wheel, used to impart a rotation to a wheel or other mechanical device; also used to change circular into reciprocating motion, or reciprocating into circular motion.

As verbs the difference between handle and crank

is that handle is to use the hands while crank is to turn by means of a crank .

As an adjective crank is

(slang) strange, weird, odd.

handle

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) handel, handle, from (etyl) .

Noun

(en noun)
  • A part of an object which is held in the hand when used or moved, as the haft of a sword, the knob of a door, the bail of a kettle, etc.
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  • That of which use is made; an instrument for effecting a purpose (either literally or figuratively); a tool.
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  • (Australia, New Zealand) A 10 fl oz (285 ml) glass of beer in the Northern Territory. See also pot, middy for other regional variations.
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  • (American) A half-gallon (1.75-liter) bottle of alcohol.
  • (computing) A reference to an object or structure that can be stored in a variable.
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  • This article describes how to find the module name from the window handle .
  • (gambling) The gross amount of wagering within a given period of time or for a given event at one of more establishments.
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  • The daily handle of a Las Vegas casino is typically millions of dollars.
  • (geography, Newfoundland, and, Labrador, rare) A point, an extremity of land.
  • Handle of the Sug, Nfld.
  • (textiles) The tactile qualities of a fabric, e.g., softness, firmness, elasticity, fineness, resilience, and other qualities perceived by touch.
  • (topology) A topological space homeomorphic to a ball but viewed as a product of two lower-dimensional balls.
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  • Derived terms
    * give a handle * handlebar, handlebars * handlebody * handleless * handling * love handle

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) handlen, from (etyl) .

    Verb

  • To use the hands.
  • * Psalm 115:7:
  • They [idols made of gold and silver] have hands, but they handle not
  • To touch; to feel with the hand.
  • * Luke 24:39:
  • Handle me, and see; for a spirit hath not flesh.
  • To use or hold with the hand.
  • * :
  • About his altar, handling holy things
  • To manage in using, as a spade or a musket; to wield; often, to manage skillfully.
  • * Shakespeare, King Lear , IV-vi:
  • That fellow handles his bow like a crowkeeper
  • To accustom to the hand; to work upon, or take care of, with the hands.
  • * Sir W. Temple:
  • The hardness of the winters forces the breeders to house and handle their colts six months every year
  • To receive and transfer; to have pass through one's hands; hence, to buy and sell
  • a merchant handles a variety of goods, or a large stock
  • To deal with; to make a business of.
  • * Jeremiah, 2:8:
  • They that handle the law knew me not
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2011 , date=December 16 , author=Denis Campbell , title=Hospital staff 'lack skills to cope with dementia patients' , work=Guardian citation , page= , passage=The findings emerged from questionnaires filled in by 2,211 staff in 145 wards of 55 hospitals in England and Wales and 105 observations of care of dementia patients. Two-thirds of staff said they had not had enough training to provide proper care, 50% said they had not been trained how to communicate properly with such patients and 54% had not been told how to handle challenging or aggressive behaviour.}}
  • To treat; to use, well or ill.
  • * Shakespeare, Henry VI , Part I, I-iv:
  • How wert thou handled being prisoner
  • To manage; to control; to practice skill upon.
  • * Shakespeare, Measure for Measure , V-i:
  • You shall see how I'll handle her
  • To use or manage in writing or speaking; to treat, as a theme, an argument, or an objection.
  • * :
  • We will handle what persons are apt to envy others
  • (soccer) To touch the ball with the hand or arm; to commit handball.
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2011 , date=February 12 , author=Les Roopanarine , title=Birmingham 1 - 0 Stoke , work=BBC citation , page= , passage=Robert Huth handled a Bentley shot, only for the offence to go unnoticed.}}
    Synonyms
    * feel * finger * touch * deal * manage * treat
    Derived terms
    * to handle without gloves: (colloquial) See under glove * mishandle

    Etymology 3

    Originally Cornish-American, from (etyl) , later hanow (pronounced han'of'' or ''han'o ).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (slang) A name, nickname or pseudonym.
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  • crank

    English

    Adjective

    (er)
  • (slang) strange, weird, odd
  • sick; unwell; infirm
  • (nautical, of a ship) Liable to capsize because of poorly stowed cargo or insufficient ballast
  • Full of spirit; brisk; lively; sprightly; overconfident; opinionated.
  • * Udall
  • He who was, a little before, bedrid, was now crank and lusty.
  • * Mrs. Stowe
  • If you strong electioners did not think you were among the elect, you would not be so crank about it.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A bent piece of an axle or shaft, or an attached arm perpendicular, or nearly so, to the end of a shaft or wheel, used to impart a rotation to a wheel or other mechanical device; also used to change circular into reciprocating motion, or reciprocating into circular motion.(rfex)
  • The act of converting power into motion, by turning a crankshaft.
  • Yes, a crank was all it needed to start .
  • (archaic) Any bend, turn, or winding, as of a passage.
  • * (rfdate) Spenser:
  • So many turning cranks these have, so many crooks.
  • (informal) An ill-tempered or nasty person
  • Billy-Bob is a nasty old crank ! He chased my cat away.
  • A twist or turn of the mind; caprice; whim; crotchet; also, a fit of temper or passion.
  • * Carlyle
  • Violent of temper; subject to sudden cranks .
  • (informal, British, dated in US) A person who is considered strange or odd by others. They may behave in unconventional ways.
  • John is a crank because he talks to himself .
  • * 1882 January 14, in Pall Mall Gazette :
  • Persons whom the Americans since Guiteau's trial have begun to designate as ‘cranks’ —that is to say, persons of disordered mind, in whom the itch of notoriety supplies the lack of any higher ambition.
  • (informal) An advocate of a pseudoscience movement.
  • That crank next door thinks he's created cold fusion in his garage.
  • (US, slang) methamphetamine.
  • Danny got abscesses from shooting all that bathtub crank .
  • (rare) A twist or turn in speech; a conceit consisting in a change of the form or meaning of a word.
  • * (rfdate) Milton:
  • Quips, and cranks , and wanton wiles.
  • (obsolete) A sick person; an invalid.
  • * Burton
  • Thou art a counterfeit crank , a cheater.
  • (slang) penis.
  • * 2013 , Reggie Chesterfield, Scoundrel (page 57)
  • It was going to be hard not to blow with a girl like her sucking on his crank .

    Synonyms

    * See also .

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To turn by means of a crank .
  • Motorists had to crank their engine by hand.
  • To turn a crank .
  • He's been cranking all day and yet it refuses to crank.
  • To turn.
  • He's been cranking all day and yet it refuses to crank .
  • To cause to spin via other means, as though turned by a crank.
  • I turn the key and crank the engine; yet it doesn't turn over
    Crank it up!
  • To act in a cranky manner; to behave unreasonably and irritably, especially through complaining.
  • Quit cranking about your spilt milk!
  • To be running at a high level of output or effort.
  • By one hour into the shift, the boys were really cranking .
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  • (dated) To run with a winding course; to double; to crook; to wind and turn.
  • * (rfdate) :
  • See how this river comes me cranking in.

    Derived terms

    * crank axle * crank call * crankcase * crank out * crankpin * crank pin * crank shaft * crankstart * crank start * crank up * crank wheel * cranky * turn someone's crank