Cooer vs Coyer - What's the difference?

cooer | coyer |


As a noun cooer

is one who coos.

As an adjective coyer is

(coy).

cooer

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • One who coos.
  • * 1863 , Henry Gardiner Adams, Our feathered families (page 334)
  • The best Pigeon House, of course, is one made expressly for the purpose — about square, with a shelving roof. Here the compartments can be made sufficiently wide and high; say a foot and a half, or even two feet each way. The latter is a comfortable chamber for the pair of cooers .

    coyer

    English

    Adjective

    (head)
  • (coy)
  • Anagrams

    * * ----

    coy

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) coi, earlier .

    Adjective

    (er)
  • (dated) Bashful, shy, retiring.
  • (archaic) Quiet, reserved, modest.
  • Reluctant to give details about something sensitive; notably prudish.
  • Pretending shyness or modesty, especially in an insincere or flirtatious way.
  • Soft, gentle, hesitating.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Enforced hate, / Instead of love's coy touch, shall rudely tear thee.
    Derived terms
    * coyly * coyness

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (obsolete) To caress, pet; to coax, entice.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Come sit thee down upon this flowery bed, / While I thy amiable cheeks do coy .
  • (obsolete) To calm or soothe.
  • To allure; to decoy.
  • * Bishop Rainbow
  • A wiser generation, who have the art to coy the fonder sort into their nets.

    Etymology 2

    Compare decoy.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A trap from which waterfowl may be hunted.
  • References

    * [http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?search=coy&searchmode=none]