Cover vs Bark - What's the difference?

cover | bark |


As nouns the difference between cover and bark

is that cover is a lid while bark is the short, loud, explosive sound uttered by a dog or bark can be (countable|uncountable) the exterior covering of the trunk and branches of a tree or bark can be (obsolete) a small sailing vessel, eg a pinnace or a fishing smack; a rowing boat or barge.

As verbs the difference between cover and bark

is that cover is to place something over or upon, as to conceal or protect while bark is to make a short, loud, explosive noise with the vocal organs (said of animals, especially dogs) or bark can be to strip the bark from; to peel.

As a adjective cover

is of or pertaining to the front cover of a book or magazine.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

cover

English

(wikipedia cover)

Noun

(en noun)
  • A lid.
  • A hiding from view.
  • A front and back of a book or magazine.
  • A top sheet of a bed.
  • A cover charge.
  • A setting at a restaurant table or formal .
  • * {{quote-book, year=1897, author=
  • , title=(The Celebrity) , chapter=1 citation , passage=When I gave a dinner there was generally a cover laid for him. I liked the man for his own sake, and even had he promised to turn out a celebrity it would have had no weight with me.}}
  • (music) A rerecording of a previously recorded song; a cover version; a cover song.
  • (cricket) A fielding position on the off side, between point and mid off, about 30° forward of square; a fielder in this position.
  • (topology) A set (more often known as a family ) of sets, whose union contains the given set.
  • (philately) An envelope complete with stamps and postmarks etc.
  • (military) A solid object, including terrain, that provides protection from enemy fire.
  • (legal) In commercial law, a buyer’s purchase on the open market of goods similar or identical to the goods contracted for after a seller has breached a contract of sale by failure to deliver the goods contracted for.
  • (insurance) An insurance contract; coverage by an insurance contract.
  • (espionage) A persona maintained by a spy or undercover operative, cover story
  • The portion of a slate, tile, or shingle that is hidden by the overlap of the course above.
  • (Knight)
  • In a steam engine, the lap of a slide valve.
  • Derived terms

    * cover board * cover charge * cover letter * cover story * cover version * take cover * tonneau cover

    Adjective

    (-)
  • Of or pertaining to the front cover of a book or magazine.
  • (music) Of, pertaining to, or consisting of cover versions.
  • Verb

    (en verb)
  • To place something over or upon, as to conceal or protect.
  • :
  • :
  • To be over or upon, as to conceal or protect.
  • :
  • *
  • *:A great bargain also had been the excellent Axminster carpet which covered the floor; as, again, the arm-chair in which Bunting now sat forward, staring into the dull, small fire.
  • *{{quote-magazine, year=2013, month=May-June, author= Charles T. Ambrose
  • , title= Alzheimer’s Disease , volume=101, issue=3, page=200, magazine=(American Scientist) , passage=Similar studies of rats have employed four different intracranial resorbable, slow sustained release systems—
  • To be upon all of, so as to completely conceal.
  • :
  • To set upon all of, so as to completely conceal.
  • :
  • To invest (oneself with something); to bring upon (oneself).
  • :
  • *(John Brougham) (1814-1880)
  • *:the powers that covered themselves with everlasting infamy by the partition of Poland
  • (label) To discuss thoroughly; to provide coverage of.
  • :
  • To deal with.
  • *2010 (publication date), "Contributors", , ISSN 0274-7529, volume 32, number 1, January–February 2011, page 7:
  • *:Richard Morgan covers science for The Economist'', ''The New York Times'', ''Scientific American'', and ''Wired .
  • To be enough money for.
  • :
  • :
  • (label) To act as a replacement.
  • :
  • (label) To have as an assignment or responsibility.
  • :
  • :
  • (label) To make a cover version of (a song that was originally recorded by another artist).
  • To protect using an aimed firearm and the threat of firing; or'' to protect using continuous, heaving fire at or in the direction of the enemy so as to force the enemy to remain in cover; ''or to threaten using an aimed firearm.
  • To provide insurance coverage for.
  • :
  • To copulate with (said of certain male animals such as dogs and horses).
  • :
  • :
  • To protect or control (a piece or square).
  • :
  • Derived terms

    * coverage * cover up * cover one's bases * coverer * discover * duck and cover * recover * uncover

    Descendants

    * German: (l)

    bark

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) barken, berken, borken, from (etyl) .

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To make a short, loud, explosive noise with the vocal organs (said of animals, especially dogs).
  • The neighbour's dog is always barking .
    The seal barked as the zookeeper threw fish into its enclosure.
  • To make a clamor; to make importunate outcries.
  • * (rfdate), Tyndale.
  • They bark , and say the Scripture maketh heretics.
  • * (rfdate), Fuller
  • Where there is the barking of the belly, there no other commands will be heard, much less obeyed. .
  • To speak sharply.
  • The sergeant barked an order.
  • * {{quote-news, year=2011
  • , date=January 5 , author=Mark Ashenden , title=Wolverhampton 1 - 0 Chelsea , work=BBC citation , page= , passage=While McCarthy prowled the touchline barking orders, his opposite number watched on motionless and expressionless and, with 25 minutes to go, decided to throw on Nicolas Anelka for Kalou.}}
    Usage notes
    Historically, bork'' existed as a past tense form and ''borken as a past participle, but both forms are now obsolete.
    Derived terms
    * bark up the wrong tree * barking * barking dogs never bite * bebark * dogs bark *
    Synonyms
    * latrate (obsolete)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The short, loud, explosive sound uttered by a dog.
  • A similar sound made by some other animals.
  • (figuratively) An abrupt loud vocal utterance.
  • * circa 1921 , The Cambridge History of English and American Literature , vol 11:
  • Fox’s clumsy figure, negligently dressed in blue and buff, seemed unprepossessing; only his shaggy eyebrows added to the expression of his face; his voice would rise to a bark in excitement.

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) bark, from (etyl) .

    Noun

    (wikipedia bark)
  • (countable, uncountable) The exterior covering of the trunk and branches of a tree.
  • * '>citation
  • Moving about 70 miles per hour, it crashed through the sturdy old-growth trees, snapping their limbs and shredding bark from their trunks.
  • (medicine) Peruvian bark or Jesuit's bark, the bark of the cinchona from which quinine is produced.
  • The crust formed on barbecued meat that has had a rub applied to it.
  • * 2009 , Julie Reinhardt, She-Smoke: A Backyard Barbecue Book , page 151:
  • This softens the meat further, but at some loss of crunch to the bark .
    Usage notes
    Usually uncountable; bark may be countable when referring to the barks of different types of tree.
    Synonyms
    * (exterior covering of a tree) rind

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To strip the bark from; to peel.
  • To abrade or rub off any outer covering from.
  • to bark one’s heel
  • To girdle.
  • To cover or inclose with bark, or as with bark.
  • bark the roof of a hut

    Etymology 3

    From (etyl) , from Egyptian b?re .

    Alternative forms

    * barque

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete) A small sailing vessel, e.g. a pinnace or a fishing smack; a rowing boat or barge.
  • (poetic) a sailing vessel or boat of any kind.
  • * circa 1609 , William Shakespeare, Sonnet 116:
  • It is the star to every wandering bark
  • * circa 1880 , among the Poems of Emily Dickinson:
  • Whether my bark went down at sea, Whether she met with gales,
  • (nautical) A three-masted vessel, having her foremast and mainmast square-rigged, and her mizzenmast schooner-rigged.