Embolden vs Countenance - What's the difference?

embolden | countenance | Related terms |

Embolden is a related term of countenance.


In lang=en terms the difference between embolden and countenance

is that embolden is to encourage, inspire, or motivate while countenance is to tolerate, support, sanction, patronise or approve of something.

As verbs the difference between embolden and countenance

is that embolden is to render (someone) bolder or more courageous while countenance is to tolerate, support, sanction, patronise or approve of something.

As a noun countenance is

appearance, especially the features and expression of the face.

embolden

English

Verb

(en verb)
  • To render (someone) bolder or more courageous.
  • To encourage, inspire, or motivate.
  • (typography) To format text in boldface.
  • * 2004 : Jason Whittaker, The Cyberspace Handbook , p216
  • The tags

    indicate paragraphs breaks, and we have included some basic text formatting: for emphasis (typically italics), for underline and to embolden text.

    Synonyms

    * (typography) boldface

    References

    countenance

    English

    Alternative forms

    * countenaunce (obsolete)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Appearance, especially the features and expression of the face.
  • * , Genesis 4:5
  • But unto Cain and to his offering he had not respect. And Cain was very wroth, and his countenance fell.
  • *{{quote-book, year=1959, author=(Georgette Heyer), title=(The Unknown Ajax), chapter=1
  • , passage=But Richmond, his grandfather's darling, after one thoughtful glance cast under his lashes at that uncompromising countenance appeared to lose himself in his own reflections.}}
  • Favour; support; encouragement.
  • * (Bible), (Psalms) xxi. 6
  • Thou hast made himglad with thy countenance .
  • * (Francis Atterbury) (1663-1732)
  • This is the magistrate's peculiar province, to give countenance to piety and virtue, and to rebuke vice.
  • (label) Superficial appearance; show; pretense.
  • * (Roger Ascham) (1515-1568)
  • The election being done, he made countenance of great discontent thereat.

    Synonyms

    * See also

    Verb

    (countenanc)
  • To tolerate, support, sanction, patronise or approve of something.
  • ''The cruel punishment was countenanced by the government, although it was not officially legal.
  • * 1925 , Franz Kafka, The Trial'', ''Vintage Books (London) , pg. 99:
  • For the Defence was not actually countenanced by the Law, but only tolerated, and there were differences of opinion even on that point, whether the Law could be interpreted to admit such tolerances at all.

    Synonyms

    * approve, sanction, support, tolerate

    References

    * * ----