Corpse vs Undead - What's the difference?

corpse | undead |


As nouns the difference between corpse and undead

is that corpse is a dead body while undead is those creatures which are dead yet still moving.

As a verb corpse

is (intransitive|slang|of an actor) to lose control during a performance and laugh uncontrollably.

As a adjective undead is

pertaining to a corpse, though having qualities of life.

corpse

English

Alternative forms

* corse (obsolete)

Noun

(en noun)
  • A dead body.
  • (archaic, sometimes, derogatory) A human body in general, whether living or dead.
  • Synonyms

    * body * cadaver * carcass * See also

    Verb

    (corps)
  • (intransitive, slang, of an actor) To lose control during a performance and laugh uncontrollably.
  • Anagrams

    *

    undead

    English

    Adjective

    (-)
  • Pertaining to a corpse, though having qualities of life.
  • (horror fiction) Being animate, though non-living.
  • Noun

    (wikipedia undead) (en-noun)
  • Those creatures which are dead yet still moving.
  • In the zombie movie, an army of the undead accosted some nubile skinny-dipping teenagers.
  • * 1997 , Carol Margaret Davison, Paul Simpson-Housley, Bram Stoker's Dracula: sucking through the century, 1897-1997
  • Innocent VIII lent credibility to the actual existence of undeads , an action that perpetuated, and even stimulated, vampire hysteria.

    See also

    * zombie * vampire * mummy * living dead * Frankenstein * Frankenstein's monster