Contraction vs Coronis - What's the difference?

contraction | coronis |


As nouns the difference between contraction and coronis

is that contraction is a reversible reduction in size while coronis is a device, curved stroke, or flourish formed with a pen, coming at the end of a book or chapter; a colophon.

contraction

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • A reversible reduction in size.
  • (economics) A period of economic decline or negative growth.
  • The country's economic contraction was caused by high oil prices.
  • (biology) A shortening of a muscle when it is used.
  • (medicine) A strong and often painful shortening of the uterine muscles prior to or during childbirth.
  • (linguistics) A process whereby one or more sounds of a free morpheme (a word) are lost or reduced, such that it becomes a bound morpheme (a clitic) that attaches phonologically to an adjacent word.
  • In English ''didn't'', ''that's'', and ''wanna'', the endings ''-n't'', ''-'s'', and ''-a'' arose by contraction .
  • (English orthography) A word with omitted letters replaced by an apostrophe, usually resulting from the above process.
  • "Don't" is a contraction of "do not."
  • (medicine) Contracting a disease.
  • The contraction of AIDS from toilet seats is extremely rare.
  • (phonetics) Syncope, the loss of sounds from within a word.
  • The acquisition of something, generally negative.
  • Our contraction of debt in this quarter has reduced our ability to attract investors.
  • (medicine) A distinct stage of wound healing, wherein the wound edges are gradually pulled together.
  • Antonyms

    * expansion * dilatation

    Derived terms

    * contractional * contractionary * hypercontraction * supercontraction

    See also

    * omission * *

    coronis

    English

    Noun

    (coronides)
  • A device, curved stroke, or flourish formed with a pen, coming at the end of a book or chapter; a colophon.
  • (figuratively, obsolete, rare) A thing’s conclusion; its end.
  • * 1592–1670 : , Scrinia reserata: a Memorial offer’d to the great Deservings of John Williams, D.D., Archbishop of York , volume 2, page 38
  • The coronis of this matter is thus?;?some bad ones in this family were punish’d strictly, all rebuk’d, not all amended.
  • A spiritus lenis'' written atop a non–word-initial vowel retained from the second word which formed a contraction resulting from ''crasis ; see .
  • Usage notes

    * Generally, the Ancient Greek spiritûs'' are only written atop initial letters ''rho'', initial vowels, and the second vowels of word-initial diphthongs. The coronis is one of only two exceptions to this rule; the other is the case of the double-''rho , which is written as .

    See also

    * colophon * vignette

    References

    Anagrams

    * ----