What is the difference between cord and string?

cord | string | Synonyms |

Cord is a synonym of string.


As nouns the difference between cord and string

is that cord is a long, thin, flexible length of twisted yarns (strands) of fiber (rope, for example); (uncountable) such a length of twisted strands considered as a commodity while string is (countable) a long, thin and flexible structure made from threads twisted together.

As verbs the difference between cord and string

is that cord is to furnish with cords while string is to put (items) on a string.

cord

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • A long, thin, flexible length of twisted yarns (strands) of fiber (rope, for example); (uncountable) such a length of twisted strands considered as a commodity.
  • The burglar tied up the victim with a cord .
    He looped some cord around his fingers.
  • A small flexible electrical conductor composed of wires insulated separately or in bundles and assembled together usually with an outer cover; the electrical cord of a lamp, sweeper ((US) vacuum cleaner), or other appliance.
  • A unit of measurement for firewood, equal to 128 cubic feet (4 × 4 × 8 feet), composed of logs and/or split logs four feet long and none over eight inches diameter. It is usually seen as a stack four feet high by eight feet long.
  • * 1851 , Herman Melville, Moby-Dick
  • Unerringly impelling this dead, impregnable, uninjurable wall, and this most buoyant thing within; there swims behind it all a mass of tremendous life, only to be adequately estimated as piled wood is—by the cord
  • (in plural'' cords ) ''See cords.
  • : a cross-section measurement of an aircraft wing.
  • : musical sense.
  • (figuratively) Any influence by which persons are caught, held, or drawn, as if by a cord.
  • * Tennyson
  • The knots that tangle human creeds, / The wounding cords that bind and strain / The heart until it bleeds.
  • * 1900 , , The House Behind the Cedars , Chapter I,
  • Every detail of the house and garden was familiar; a thousand cords of memory and affection drew him thither; but a stronger counter-motive prevailed.
  • (anatomy) Any structure having the appearance of a cord, especially a tendon or nerve.
  • spermatic''' cord; '''spinal''' cord; '''umbilical''' cord; '''vocal cords

    Synonyms

    * (length of twisted strands) cable, twine * cable, flex * See also

    Derived terms

    * cordless * extension cord * power cord * pull cord * spinal cord * umbilical cord * vocal cords

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To furnish with cords
  • To tie or fasten with cords
  • To flatten a book during binding
  • To arrange (wood, etc.) in a pile for measurement by the cord.
  • ----

    string

    English

    Noun

  • (countable) A long, thin and flexible structure made from threads twisted together.
  • * Prior
  • Round Ormond's knee thou tiest the mystic string .
  • (uncountable) Such a structure considered as a substance.
  • (countable) Any similar long, thin and flexible object.
  • a violin string
    a bowstring
  • A thread or cord on which a number of objects or parts are strung or arranged in close and orderly succession; hence, a line or series of things arranged on a thread, or as if so arranged.
  • a string''' of shells or beads; a '''string of sausages
  • * Gibbon
  • a string of islands
  • (countable) A cohesive substance taking the form of a string.
  • The string of spittle dangling from his chin was most unattractive
  • (countable) A series of items or events.
  • a string of successes
  • (countable, computing) An ordered sequence of text characters stored consecutively in memory and capable of being processed as a single entity.
  • (music, countable) A stringed instrument.
  • (music, usually in plural) The stringed instruments as a section of an orchestra, especially those played by a bow, or the persons playing those instruments.
  • (in the plural) The conditions and limitations in a contract collecively. (compare no strings attached)
  • no strings attached
  • (countable, physics) the main object of study in string theory, a branch of theoretical physics
  • (slang) cannabis or marijuana
  • A miniature game of billiards, where the order of the play is determined by testing who can get a ball closest to the bottom rail by shooting it onto the end rail.
  • The points made in a game of billiards.
  • A strip, as of leather, by which the covers of a book are held together.
  • (Milton)
  • A fibre, as of a plant; a little fibrous root.
  • * Francis Bacon
  • Duckweed putteth forth a little string into the water, from the bottom.
  • A nerve or tendon of an animal body.
  • * Bible, Mark vii. 35
  • The string of his tongue was loosed.
  • (shipbuilding) An inside range of ceiling planks, corresponding to the sheer strake on the outside and bolted to it.
  • (botany) The tough fibrous substance that unites the valves of the pericarp of leguminous plants.
  • the strings of beans
  • (mining) A small, filamentous ramification of a metallic vein.
  • (Ure)
  • (architecture) A stringcourse.
  • Synonyms

    * See also

    Derived terms

    * score string * second string

    Synonyms

    * (long, thin structure): cord, rope, line * (this structure as a substance): cord, rope, twine * (anything long and thin): * (cohesive substance in the form of a string): * (series of items or events): sequence, series * (sequence of characters in computing): * (stringed instruments): string section the strings, or the string section * (conditions): conditions, provisos

    Descendants

    * Portuguese:

    Verb

  • To put (items) on a string.
  • You can string these beads on to this cord to make a colorful necklace.
  • To put strings on (something).
  • It is difficult to string a tennis racket properly.

    Synonyms

    * (put on a string): thread * (put strings on): lace

    Derived terms

    * cosmic string * heartstrings * string along * string band * string quartet * string up * string vest * stringy