Wide vs Copious - What's the difference?

wide | copious | Related terms |

Wide is a related term of copious.


As adjectives the difference between wide and copious

is that wide is having a large physical extent from side to side while copious is great in quantity or number, profuse, abundant; taking place on a large scale.

As an adverb wide

is extensively.

As a noun wide

is (cricket) a ball that passes so far from the batsman that the umpire deems it unplayable; the arm signal used by an umpire to signal a wide; the extra run added to the batting side's score.

wide

English

Adjective

(er)
  • Having a large physical extent from side to side.
  • Large in scope.
  • * {{quote-magazine, year=2013, month=July-August, author= Fenella Saunders
  • , title= Tiny Lenses See the Big Picture, magazine=(American Scientist) , passage=The single-imaging optic of the mammalian eye offers some distinct visual advantages. Such lenses can take in photons from a wide range of angles, increasing light sensitivity. They also have high spatial resolution, resolving incoming images in minute detail.}}
  • (sports) Operating at the side of the playing area.
  • On one side or the other of the mark; too far sideways from the mark, the wicket, the batsman, etc.
  • * Spenser
  • Surely he shoots wide on the bow hand.
  • * Massinger
  • I was but two bows wide .
  • (phonetics, dated) Made, as a vowel, with a less tense, and more open and relaxed, condition of the organs in the mouth.
  • Remote; distant; far.
  • * Hammond
  • the contrary being so wide from the truth of Scripture and the attributes of God
  • (obsolete) Far from truth, propriety, necessity, etc.
  • * Milton
  • our wide expositors
  • * Latimer
  • It is far wide that the people have such judgments.
  • * Herbert
  • How wide is all this long pretence!
  • (computing) Of or supporting a greater range of text characters than can fit into the traditional representation.
  • a wide''' character; a '''wide stream

    Antonyms

    * narrow (regarding empty area) * thin (regarding occupied area) * skinny (sometimes offensive, regarding body width)

    Adverb

    (er)
  • extensively
  • He travelled far and wide .
  • completely
  • He was wide awake.
  • away from a given goal
  • The arrow fell wide of the mark.
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2010 , date=December 29 , author=Sam Sheringham , title=Liverpool 0 - 1 Wolverhampton , work=BBC citation , page= , passage=The Reds carved the first opening of the second period as Glen Johnson's pull-back found David Ngog but the Frenchman hooked wide from six yards.}}
  • So as to leave or have a great space between the sides; so as to form a large opening.
  • (Shakespeare)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (cricket) A ball that passes so far from the batsman that the umpire deems it unplayable; the arm signal used by an umpire to signal a wide; the extra run added to the batting side's score
  • 1000 English basic words ----

    copious

    English

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • Great in quantity or number, profuse, abundant; taking place on a large scale.
  • * 1748 . David Hume. Enquiry concerning Human Understanding. Section 3. ยง 18.
  • These loose hints I have thrown together, in order to excite the curiosity of philosophers, and beget a suspicion at least, if not a full persuasion, that this subject is very copious ,
  • Having an abundant supply.
  • Full of thought, information, or matter; exuberant in words, expression, or style.
  • References