What is the difference between cook and devise?

cook | devise | Hypernyms |

Devise is a hypernym of cook.


In context|transitive|lang=en terms the difference between cook and devise

is that cook is {{context|transitive|lang=en}} to prepare (food) for eating by heating it, often by combining it with other ingredients while devise is {{context|transitive|lang=en}} to leave (property) in a will.

As nouns the difference between cook and devise

is that cook is {{context|cooking|lang=en}} a person who prepares food for a living while devise is the act of leaving real property in a will.

As verbs the difference between cook and devise

is that cook is {{context|transitive|lang=en}} to prepare (food) for eating by heating it, often by combining it with other ingredients or cook can be {{context|obsolete|rare|lang=en}} to make the noise of the cuckoo or cook can be {{context|uk|dialect|obsolete|lang=en}} to throw while devise is {{context|transitive|lang=en}} to use one's intellect to plan or design (something).

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

cook

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl), from (etyl) . The verb is from (etyl) coken, from the noun.

Noun

(wikipedia cook) (en noun)
  • (cooking) A person who prepares food for a living.
  • (cooking) The head cook of a manor house
  • (slang) One who manufactures certain illegal drugs, especially meth.
  • Police found two meth cooks working in the illicit lab.
  • * Mel Bradshaw, Victim Impact
  • By late October, the pressure on the Dark Arrows' ecstasy cook had eased. Other suppliers had moved in with product.
  • * 2011 , Mackenzie Phillips, High on Arrival
  • Owsley Stanley was a pioneer LSD cook , and the Purple Owsley pill from his now-defunct lab was Dad's prized possession, a rare, potent, druggie collector's item, the alleged inspiration for the Hendrix song “Purple Haze.”
  • A fish, the European striped wrasse.
  • Synonyms
    * (food preparation for a living) chef
    Hyponyms
    * (food preparation for a living) cordon bleu
    Coordinate terms
    (food preparation for a living) * sous-chef * line cook * prep cook * chef (head cook of a manor house) * scullery maid * kitchen maid
    Derived terms
    * cookbook * cookery * cooking * cook the books * cook up * cookware

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To prepare (food) for eating by heating it, often by combining it with other ingredients.
  • I'm cooking bangers and mash.
  • To prepare (unspecified) food for eating by heating it, often by combining it with other ingredients.
  • He's in the kitchen, cooking .
  • To be being cooked.
  • The dinner is cooking on the stove.
  • (figuratively) To be uncomfortably hot.
  • Look at that poor dog shut up in that car on a day like today - it must be cooking in there.
  • (slang) To hold onto (a grenade) briefly after igniting the fuse, so that it explodes almost immediately after being thrown.
  • ''I always cook my frags, in case they try to grab one and throw it back.
  • To concoct or prepare.
  • * 2006 , Frank Spalding, Methamphetamine: The Dangers of Crystal Meth (page 47)
  • The process of cooking meth can leave residue on surfaces all over the home, exposing all of its occupants to the drug.
  • To tamper with or alter; to cook up.
  • * Addison
  • They all of them receive the same advices from abroad, and very often in the same words; but their way of cooking it is so different.
    Synonyms
    * (to be uncomfortably hot) bake, stew * (hold on to a grenade) cook off
    Hypernyms
    * (to prepare or plan something) concoct, contrive, devise, make up, plan, prepare
    Hyponyms
    * Troponyms : bake, barbecue, boil, braise, fry, grill, microwave, poach, roast, scramble, steam, stew * See also

    Etymology 2

    Imitative.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (obsolete, rare) To make the noise of the cuckoo.
  • * 1599 , The Silkworms
  • Constant cuckoos cook on every side.

    Etymology 3

    Unknown.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (UK, dialect, obsolete) To throw.
  • * Grose
  • Cook me that ball.
    English ergative verbs 1000 English basic words ----

    devise

    English

    (wikipedia devise)

    Verb

    (devis)
  • To use one's intellect to plan or design (something).
  • to devise''' an argument; to '''devise a machine, or a new system of writing
  • * Bancroft
  • devising schemes to realize his ambitious views
  • *
  • Thus, the task of the linguist devising' a grammar which models the linguistic competence of the fluent native speaker is to '''devise a ''finite'' set of rules which are capable of specifying how to form, interpret, and pronounce an ''infinite set of well-formed sentences.
  • To leave (property) in a will.
  • (archaic) To form a scheme; to lay a plan; to contrive; to consider.
  • * Alexander Pope
  • I thought, devised , and Pallas heard my prayer.
  • (archaic) To plan or scheme for; to plot to obtain.
  • * Spenser
  • For wisdom is most riches; fools therefore / They are which fortunes do by vows devise .
  • (obsolete) To imagine; to guess.
  • (Spenser)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The act of leaving real property in a will.
  • Such a will, or a clause in such a will.
  • * Bancroft
  • Fines upon devises were still exacted.
  • The real property left in such a will.
  • See also

    * device * devising

    Anagrams

    * ----