Looed vs Cooed - What's the difference?

looed | cooed |


As verbs the difference between looed and cooed

is that looed is (loo) while cooed is (coo).

looed

English

Verb

(head)
  • (loo)

  • loo

    English

    Etymology 1

    Uncertain; possible origins include: * French lieux'', short for ''lieux d'aisances ‘toilets’, literally ‘places of convenience’. * A particular brand of early toilet cisterns, trademarked 'Waterloo'. A common folk etymology is that the word comes from the exclamation gardyloo'', from French ''garde à l'eau ‘mind the water!’, used when emptying dirty water or slops out of a window onto the public sidewalk or street.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (colloquial, Australia, NZ, UK) A toilet.
  • * 2006 , Garth Thompson, Dov Fedler, The Guide?s Guide to Guiding , 3rd Edition, Jacana Media, South Africa, page 160,
  • Ensure that the tents are well-sited and clean, rubbish bins empty and that the loos have toilet paper.
  • * 2009 , Katharina Kane, The Gambia and Senegal , Lonely Planet, page 275,
  • The lack of running water in rural areas often makes Western-style loos hygienic disasters. Suddenly the noncontact squat toilet doesn?t look like such a bad option any more (as long as you roll up your trouser legs).
  • * 2010 , Meegan Jones, Sustainable Event Management: A Practical Guide , Earthscan, page 206,
  • Waterless urinals are a great way of keeping the guys out of the cubicle toilets, keeping the urine separated from the solid waste (when using composting loos') and reducing water consumption if you have flush ' loos .
    References

    Etymology 2

    Shortened form of lanterloo.

    Noun

    (-)
  • The card game lanterloo.
  • Verb

    (en verb)
  • To beat in the game of loo by winning every trick.
  • (Goldsmith)

    Etymology 3

    From (etyl) .

    Noun

    (-)
  • A hot, dusty wind in Bihar and the Punjab.
  • * 1888 , Rudyard Kipling, ‘The Man Who Would be King’, The Phantom ’Rickshaw and Other Tales , Folio Society 2005, p. 135:
  • It was a pitchy black night, as stifling as a June night can be, and the loo , the red-hot wind from the westward, was booming among the tinder-dry trees and pretending that the rain was on its heels.
    English terms with unknown etymologies ----

    cooed

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (coo)

  • coo

    English

    Etymology 1

    Of onomatopoetic/imitative origin.

    Noun

    (-)
  • The murmuring sound made by a dove or pigeon.
  • Verb

    (en verb)
  • (transitive, or, intransitive) To make a soft murmuring sound, as a pigeon.
  • * 26 June 2014 , A.A Dowd, AV Club Paul Rudd and Amy Poehler spoof rom-com clichés in They Came Together [http://www.avclub.com/review/paul-rudd-and-amy-poehler-spoof-rom-com-cliches-th-206220]
  • As Norah Jones coos sweet nothings on the soundtrack, the happy couple—played by Paul Rudd and Amy Poehler—canoodle through a Manhattan montage, making pasta for two, swimming through a pile of autumn leaves, and horsing around at a fruit stand.
  • To speak in an admiring fashion, to be enthusiastic about.
  • * 2013 , Nicola Cornick, One Night with the Laird (page 206)
  • They were too busy cooing over the baby and his parents were too busy cooing over each other.
    Derived terms
    * cooer * cooingly

    Etymology 2

    Shortening of cool. Compare foo.

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • (slang) cool
  • Etymology 3

    Interjection

    (en interjection)
  • Expression of fright, surprise, approval, etc.
  • * {{quote-book
  • , year=1960 , author= , title=(Jeeves in the Offing) , section=chapter VII , passage=I stood outside the door for a space, letting “I dare not” wait upon “I would”, as Jeeves tells me cats do in adages, then turned the handle softly, pushed – also softly – and, carrying on into the interior, found myself confronted by a girl in housemaid's costume who put a hand to her throat like somebody in a play and leaped several inches in the direction of the ceiling. “Coo'!” she said, having returned to terra firma and taken aboard a spot of breath. “You gave me a start, sir!” [...] “If you cast an eye on him, you will see that he's asleep now.” “' Coo ! So he is.”}}
  • * 1988 , Sean Kelly, Professional BMX Simulator'' (video game review in ''Your Sinclair , issue 35, November 1988)
  • The last track on each of the three sections is a professional course, where you can customise your bike by changing the tyres and the size of chainwheel. Coo !
  • * 1989 , Competitions'' (in ''Sinclair User , issue 92, November 1989)
  • We want you to come up with a side splitting caption for a picture drawn by the fair hand of those at System 3. If you turn out to be the Funniest "Person", we'll give you a big wopping model of a dinosaur. Coo .
  • * 1990 , Crash readers' awards ceremony'' (in ''Crash , issue 75, April 1990)
  • Mark: 'Coo', I've only had four gallons of extra caffeine coffee today so I'm not my usual talking-to-PR-girlies-for-hours-on-end self. But bear with me a mo while I get myself together (audience waits for an age while he searches through his coat for the golden envelope). Here it is! ' Coo , and the winner is The New Zealand Story.'