Apostate vs Convert - What's the difference?

apostate | convert |


As nouns the difference between apostate and convert

is that apostate is a person who has renounced a religion or faith while convert is a person who has converted to his or her religion.

As an adjective apostate

is guilty of apostasy.

As a verb convert is

(lb) to transform or change (something) into another form, substance, state, or product.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

apostate

English

Adjective

(-)
  • Guilty of apostasy.
  • We must punish this apostate priest.
  • * Milton
  • So spake the apostate angel.
  • * Steele
  • A wretched and apostate state.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A person who has renounced a religion or faith.
  • (Roman Catholicism) One who, after having received sacred orders, renounces his clerical profession.
  • Synonyms

    * deconvert * recreant * withersake

    See also

    * heretic

    convert

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A person who has converted to his or her religion.
  • They were all converts to Islam.
  • A person who is now in favour of something that he or she previously opposed or disliked.
  • I never really liked broccoli before, but now that I've tasted it the way you cook it, I'm a convert !

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (lb) To transform or change (something) into another form, substance, state, or product.
  • :
  • *(Thomas Burnet) (1635?-1715)
  • *:if the whole atmosphere were converted into water
  • *(John Milton) (1608-1674)
  • *:That still lessens / The sorrow, and converts it nigh to joy.
  • *{{quote-magazine, year=2013, month=September-October, author= Katie L. Burke
  • , magazine=(American Scientist), title= In the News , passage=Oxygen levels on Earth skyrocketed 2.4 billion years ago, when cyanobacteria evolved photosynthesis: the ability to convert water and carbon dioxide into carbohydrates and waste oxygen using solar energy.}}
  • (lb) To change (something) from one use, function, or purpose to another.
  • :
  • *
  • *:“A tight little craft,” was Austin’s invariable comment on the matron; and she looked it, always trim and trig and smooth of surface like a converted yacht cleared for action. ¶ Near her wandered her husband, orientally bland, invariably affable,.
  • (lb) To induce (someone) to adopt a particular religion, faith, ideology or belief.
  • :
  • * (1796-1859)
  • *:No attempt was made to convert the Moslems.
  • (lb) To exchange for something of equal value.
  • :
  • (lb) To express (a quantity) in alternative units.
  • (lb) To express (a unit of measure) in terms of another; to furnish a mathematical formula by which a quantity, expressed in the former unit, may be given in the latter.
  • :
  • To appropriate wrongfully or unlawfully; to commit the common law tort of conversion.
  • To score extra points after (a try) by completing a conversion.
  • *{{quote-news, year=2011, date=February 4, author=Gareth Roberts, work=BBC
  • , title= Wales 19-26 England , passage=Flood converted to leave Wales with a 23-9 deficit going into the final quarter.}}
  • (lb) To score (a penalty).
  • *{{quote-news, year=2011, date=September 28, author=Jon Smith, work=BBC Sport
  • , title= Valencia 1-1 Chelsea , passage=But, after the error by Lampard's replacement Kalou, Roberto Soldado converted the penalty.}}
  • To score a spare.
  • (lb) To undergo a conversion of religion, faith or belief.
  • :
  • (lb) To become converted.
  • :
  • To cause to turn; to turn.
  • *(Ben Jonson) (1572-1637)
  • *:O, which way shall I first convert myself?
  • To change (one proposition) into another, so that what was the subject of the first becomes the predicate of the second.
  • To turn into another language; to translate.
  • *(Ben Jonson) (1572-1637)
  • *:which storyCatullus more elegantly converted
  • Antonyms

    * deconvert

    Derived terms

    * converter * convertible * downconvert, downconversion, downconverter * upconvert, upconversion, upconverter