Discourse vs Context - What's the difference?

discourse | context |


In obsolete|lang=en terms the difference between discourse and context

is that discourse is (obsolete) dealing; transaction while context is (obsolete) knit or woven together; close; firm.

As nouns the difference between discourse and context

is that discourse is (uncountable|archaic) verbal exchange, conversation while context is the surroundings, circumstances, environment, background or settings that determine, specify, or clarify the meaning of an event or other occurrence.

As verbs the difference between discourse and context

is that discourse is to engage in discussion or conversation; to converse while context is (obsolete) to knit or bind together; to unite closely.

As an adjective context is

(obsolete) knit or woven together; close; firm.

discourse

Noun

  • (uncountable, archaic) Verbal exchange, conversation.
  • * 1847 , , (Jane Eyre), Chapter XVIII
  • Two or three of the gentlemen sat near him, and I caught at times scraps of their conversation across the room. At first I could not make much sense of what I heard; for the discourse of Louisa Eshton and Mary Ingram, who sat nearer to me, confused the fragmentary sentences that reached me at intervals.
  • (uncountable) Expression in words, either speech or writing.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2012-03
  • , author= , title=Pixels or Perish , volume=100, issue=2, page=106 , magazine= citation , passage=Drawings and pictures are more than mere ornaments in scientific discourse . Blackboard sketches, geological maps, diagrams of molecular structure, astronomical photographs, MRI images, the many varieties of statistical charts and graphs: These pictorial devices are indispensable tools for presenting evidence, for explaining a theory, for telling a story.}}
  • (countable) A formal lengthy exposition of some subject, either spoken or written.
  • The preacher gave us a long discourse on duty.
  • (countable) Any rational expression, reason.
  • * South
  • difficult, strange, and harsh to the discourses of natural reason
  • * Shakespeare
  • Sure he that made us with such large discourse , / Looking before and after, gave us not / That capability and godlike reason / To rust in us unused.
  • (social sciences, countable) An institutionalized way of thinking, a social boundary defining what can be said about a specific topic (after ).
  • * 2007 , Christine L. Marran, Poison Woman: Figuring Female Transgression in Modern Japanese Culture (page 137)
  • Furthermore, it should be recalled from the previous chapter that criminological discourse of the 1930s deemed every woman a potential criminal, implicitly including the domestic woman.
  • * 2008 , Jane Anna Gordon, Lewis Gordon, A Companion to African-American Studies (page 308)
  • But equally important to the emergence of uniquely African-American queer discourses is the refusal of African-American movements for liberation to address adequately issues of sexual orientation and gender identity.
  • (obsolete) Dealing; transaction.
  • * Beaumont and Fletcher
  • Good Captain Bessus, tell us the discourse / Betwixt Tigranes and our king, and how / We got the victory.

    Synonyms

    * (expression in words) communication, expression * (verbal exchange) debate, conversation, discussion, talk * (formal lengthy exposition of some subject) dissertation, lecture, sermon, study, treatise * (rational expression) ratiocination

    Derived terms

    * direct discourse * indirect discourse

    Verb

    (discours)
  • To engage in discussion or conversation; to converse.
  • To write or speak formally and at length.
  • (obsolete) To debate.
  • To exercise reason; to employ the mind in judging and inferring; to reason.
  • (Dryden)

    Synonyms

    * (engage in discussion or conversation) converse, talk * (write or speak formally and at length)

    Derived terms

    * discourser

    See also

    * essay

    context

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The surroundings, circumstances, environment, background or settings that determine, specify, or clarify the meaning of an event or other occurrence.
  • In what context did your attack on him happen? - We had a pretty tense relationship at the time, and when he insulted me I snapped.
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2012 , date=September 7 , author=Phil McNulty , title=Moldova 0-5 England , work=BBC Sport citation , page= , passage=The display and result must be placed in the context that was it was against a side that looked every bit their Fifa world ranking of 141 - but England completed the job with efficiency to record their biggest away win in 19 years.}}
  • (senseid) (linguistics) The text in which a word or passage appears and which helps ascertain its meaning.
  • (archaeology) The surroundings and environment in which an artifact is found and which may provide important clues about the artifact's function and/or cultural meaning.
  • (mycology) The trama or flesh of a mushroom.
  • Antonyms

    *

    Derived terms

    () * context-dependent * context-free * context-sensitive * in context, compare in isolation * keyword in context, KWIC * keyword out of context, KWOC * out of context * take out of context

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (obsolete) To knit or bind together; to unite closely.
  • (Feltham)
  • * R. Junius
  • The whole world's frame, which is contexted only by commerce and contracts.

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • (obsolete) Knit or woven together; close; firm.
  • * Derham
  • The coats, without, are context and callous.
    ----