Contents vs Context - What's the difference?

contents | context |


As nouns the difference between contents and context

is that contents is while context is the surroundings, circumstances, environment, background or settings that determine, specify, or clarify the meaning of an event or other occurrence.

As verbs the difference between contents and context

is that contents is (content) while context is (obsolete) to knit or bind together; to unite closely.

As an adjective context is

(obsolete) knit or woven together; close; firm.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

contents

English

Noun

(head)
  • (usually plural) That which is contained.
  • It is not covered in your homeowner's policy. You need contents insurance.
    The contents of the cup had a familiar aroma.
  • * {{quote-book, year=2006, author=
  • , title=Internal Combustion , chapter=1 citation , passage=Blast after blast, fiery outbreak after fiery outbreak, like a flaming barrage from within,
  • (pluralonly) A table of contents, a list of chapters, etc. in a book, and the page numbers on which they start.
  • I always start a book by reading the dustjacket and the contents before I really dig in to the content itself.

    Verb

    (head)
  • (content)
  • English pluralia tantum ----

    context

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The surroundings, circumstances, environment, background or settings that determine, specify, or clarify the meaning of an event or other occurrence.
  • In what context did your attack on him happen? - We had a pretty tense relationship at the time, and when he insulted me I snapped.
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2012 , date=September 7 , author=Phil McNulty , title=Moldova 0-5 England , work=BBC Sport citation , page= , passage=The display and result must be placed in the context that was it was against a side that looked every bit their Fifa world ranking of 141 - but England completed the job with efficiency to record their biggest away win in 19 years.}}
  • (senseid) (linguistics) The text in which a word or passage appears and which helps ascertain its meaning.
  • (archaeology) The surroundings and environment in which an artifact is found and which may provide important clues about the artifact's function and/or cultural meaning.
  • (mycology) The trama or flesh of a mushroom.
  • Antonyms

    *

    Derived terms

    () * context-dependent * context-free * context-sensitive * in context, compare in isolation * keyword in context, KWIC * keyword out of context, KWOC * out of context * take out of context

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (obsolete) To knit or bind together; to unite closely.
  • (Feltham)
  • * R. Junius
  • The whole world's frame, which is contexted only by commerce and contracts.

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • (obsolete) Knit or woven together; close; firm.
  • * Derham
  • The coats, without, are context and callous.
    ----