Contents vs Till - What's the difference?

contents | till |


As nouns the difference between contents and till

is that contents is (content) while till is a cash register or till can be glacial drift consisting of a mixture of clay, sand, pebbles and boulders.

As verbs the difference between contents and till

is that contents is (content) while till is to develop so as to improve or prepare for usage; to cultivate (said of knowledge, virtue, mind etc).

As a preposition till is

to.

As a conjunction till is

until, until the time that.

contents

English

Noun

(head)
  • (usually plural) That which is contained.
  • It is not covered in your homeowner's policy. You need contents insurance.
    The contents of the cup had a familiar aroma.
  • * {{quote-book, year=2006, author=
  • , title=Internal Combustion , chapter=1 citation , passage=Blast after blast, fiery outbreak after fiery outbreak, like a flaming barrage from within,
  • (pluralonly) A table of contents, a list of chapters, etc. in a book, and the page numbers on which they start.
  • I always start a book by reading the dustjacket and the contents before I really dig in to the content itself.

    Verb

    (head)
  • (content)
  • English pluralia tantum ----

    till

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) (Northumbrian) til, from (etyl) til.

    Preposition

    (English prepositions)
  • To.
  • *, Bk.XVIII, Ch.vii:
  • *:Than the knyghtes parters of the lystis toke up Sir Madore and led hym tylle hys tente.
  • *1854 , Prof. John Wilson, The Genius and Character of Burns , p.194 (Google preview):
  • *:Similar sentiments will recur to everyone familiar with his writings all through them till the very end.
  • Until, up to, as late as (a given time).
  • :
  • :
  • Synonyms
    * (until) til, 'til, until

    Conjunction

    (English Conjunctions)
  • until, until the time that
  • Maybe you can, maybe you can't: you won't know till you try.
  • * 1582 , 2:7:
  • that you stir not up, nor make the beloved to awake, till she please.
  • * 1846 , Edward Lear, The Book of Nonsense :
  • She twirled round and round, / Till she sunk underground,
  • * 1912 , anonymous, Punky Dunk and the Mouse , P.F. Volland & Co.:
  • And the Mouse sat and laughed till he cried.
    Synonyms
    * (until) 'til, until

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) tillen'' "to draw" from (etyl) ''-tyllan'' (as in ''betyllan'' "to lure, decoy," and ''fortyllan'' "draw away;" related to ''tollian ). Cognate with Albanian . Or alternatively from (etyl) tylle'' "compartment" from (etyl) ''tille'' "compartment, shelter on a ship" from (etyl) '' "plank."

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A cash register
  • A removable box within a cash register containing the money
  • Pull all the tills and lock them in the safe.
  • The contents of a cash register, for example at the beginning or end of the day or of a cashier's shift
  • My count of my till was 30 dollars short.
  • (obsolete) A tray or drawer in a chest.
  • Etymology 3

    (etyl) tilian

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • to develop so as to improve or prepare for usage; to cultivate (said of knowledge, virtue, mind etc)
  • to work or cultivate or plough (soil); to prepare for growing vegetation and crops
  • * Bible, Genesis iii. 23
  • The Lord God sent him forth from the garden of Eden, to till the ground from whence he was taken.
  • to cultivate soil
  • (obsolete) To prepare; to get.
  • Etymology 4

    Unknown, but possibly via etymology 3 (the verb) because alluvial deposit is used as a fertilizer.

    Noun

    (wikipedia till) (en noun)
  • glacial drift consisting of a mixture of clay, sand, pebbles and boulders
  • (dialect) manure or other material used to fertilize land
  • Etymology 5

    Shortened from lentil.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A vetch; a tare.
  • References

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    References

    Statistics

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    Anagrams

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