Twinkle vs Sparkle - What's the difference?

twinkle | sparkle |


As verbs the difference between twinkle and sparkle

is that twinkle is (of a source of light) to shine with a flickering light; to glimmer while sparkle is to emit sparks; to throw off ignited or incandescent particles; to shine as if throwing off sparks; to emit flashes of light; to scintillate; to twinkle; as, the blazing wood sparkles; the stars sparkle.

As nouns the difference between twinkle and sparkle

is that twinkle is a sparkle or glimmer of light while sparkle is a little spark; a scintillation.

twinkle

English

Verb

(en-verb)
  • (of a source of light) to shine with a flickering light; to glimmer
  • We could see the lights of the village twinkling in the distance.
  • * Sir Isaac Newton
  • These stars do not twinkle when viewed through telescopes that have large apertures.
  • * Sir Walter Scott
  • The western sky twinkled with stars.
  • (chiefly, of eyes) to be bright with delight
  • His shrewd little eyes twinkled roguishly.
  • to bat, blink or wink the eyes
  • * Mrs. Juliet M. Hueffer Soskice, "Reminiscences of an Artist's Granddaughter",
  • She smiled and gave a little nod and twinkled her eyes
  • * L'Estrange
  • The owl fell a moping and twinkling .
  • to flit to and fro
  • * Dorothy Gilman, "Mrs. Pollifax and the Golden Triangle"
  • A butterfly twinkled among the vines

    Synonyms

    * glimmer * scintillate * wink

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • a sparkle or glimmer of light
  • * Robert De Beaugrande, "Text, Discourse, and Process",
  • Soon the rocket was out of sight, and the flame was only seen as a tiny twinkle of light.
  • a sparkle of delight in the eyes.
  • He was a rotund, jolly man with a twinkle in his eye.
  • a flitting movement
  • * James Russell Lowell, "Poetical Works of James Russell Lowell",
  • I saw the twinkle of white feet,

    sparkle

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) (m), (m), equivalent to .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A little spark; a scintillation.
  • * Spenser
  • As sparkles from the anvil rise, / When heavy hammers on the wedge are swayed.
  • * Prescott
  • The shock was sufficiently strong to strike out some sparkles of his fiery temper.
  • Brilliance; luster.
  • the sparkle of a diamond.
    =

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) (m), (m), (m), equivalent to .

    Alternative forms

    * (obsolete)

    Verb

    (sparkl)
  • To emit sparks; to throw off ignited or incandescent particles; to shine as if throwing off sparks; to emit flashes of light; to scintillate; to twinkle; as, the blazing wood sparkles; the stars sparkle.
  • * A mantelet upon his shoulder hanging Bretful of rubies red, as fire sparkling . — Chaucer.
  • * , chapter=5
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=Here, in the transept and choir, where the service was being held, one was conscious every moment of an increasing brightness; colours glowing vividly beneath the circular chandeliers, and the rows of small lights on the choristers' desks flashed and sparkled in front of the boys' faces, deep linen collars, and red neckbands.}}
  • To manifest itself by, or as if by, emitting sparks; to glisten; to flash.
  • * Milton
  • I see bright honour sparkle through your eyes.
  • To emit little bubbles, as certain kinds of liquors; to effervesce; as, sparkling wine.
  • To emit in the form or likeness of sparks.
  • * Did sparkle forth great light. — Spenser
  • (obsolete) To disperse.
  • * The Landgrave hath sparkled his army without any further enterprise. — State Papers.
  • (obsolete) To scatter on or over.
  • Synonyms
    * shine, glisten, scintillate, radiate, coruscate, glitter, twinkle =

    References

    * (Webster 1913)