Target vs Source - What's the difference?

target | source |

Target is a see also of source.


As nouns the difference between target and source

is that target is a butt or mark to shoot at, as for practice, or to test the accuracy of a firearm, or the force of a projectile while source is the person, place or thing from which something (information, goods, etc) comes or is acquired.

As verbs the difference between target and source

is that target is to aim something, especially a weapon, at (a target) while source is (chiefly|us) to obtain or procure:.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

target

English

(wikipedia target)

Noun

(en noun)
  • A butt or mark to shoot at, as for practice, or to test the accuracy of a firearm, or the force of a projectile.
  • A goal or objective.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-22, volume=407, issue=8841, page=70, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= Engineers of a different kind , passage=Private-equity nabobs bristle at being dubbed mere financiers.
  • A kind of small shield or buckler, used as a defensive weapon in war.
  • * 1598 , William Shakespeare, Henry IV , Part I, Act II, Scene IV, line 200,
  • These four came all afront, and mainly thrust at me. I made me no more ado but took all their seven points in my target , thus.
  • (obsolete) A shield resembling the Roman scutum. In modern usage, a smaller variety of shield is usually implied by this term.
  • * 1786 , Francis Grose, A Treatise on Ancient Armour and Weapons , page 22,
  • The target or buckler was carried by the heavy armed foot, it answered to the scutum of the Romans; its form was sometimes that of a rectangular parallelogram, but more commonly had its bottom rounded off; it was generally convex, being curved in its breadth.
  • (sports) The pattern or arrangement of a series of hits made by a marksman on a butt or mark.
  • (surveying) The sliding crosspiece, or vane, on a leveling staff.
  • (rail transport) A conspicuous disk attached to a switch lever to show its position, or for use as a signal.
  • (cricket) the number of runs that the side batting last needs to score in the final innings in order to win
  • (linguistics) The tenor of a metaphor.
  • (translation studies) The translated version of a document, or the language into which translation occurs.
  • A person (or group of people) that a person or organization is trying to employ or to have as a customer, audience etc.
  • * {{quote-news, year=2011, date=September 2, author=Phil McNulty, work=BBC
  • , title= Bulgaria 0-3 England , passage=Gary Cahill, a target for Arsenal and Tottenham before the transfer window closed, put England ahead early on and Rooney was on target twice before the interval as the early hostility of the Bulgarian supporters was swiftly subdued.}}

    Derived terms

    * targeter * targeting

    Synonyms

    * See also * (translated version) target language

    Coordinate terms

    * (translated version) source

    Verb

  • To aim something, especially a weapon, at (a target).
  • (figuratively) To aim for as an audience or demographic.
  • The advertising campaign targeted older women.
  • (computing) To produce code suitable for.
  • This cross-platform compiler can target any of several processors.

    See also

    *

    source

    English

    (wikipedia source)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The person, place or thing from which something (information, goods, etc.) comes or is acquired.
  • * {{quote-book, year=2006, author=(Edwin Black)
  • , title=Internal Combustion, chapter=2 citation , passage=More than a mere source of Promethean sustenance to thwart the cold and cook one's meat, wood was quite simply mankind's first industrial and manufacturing fuel.}}
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-07-06, volume=408, issue=8843, page=68, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= The rise of smart beta , passage=Investors face a quandary. Cash offers a return of virtually zero in many developed countries; government-bond yields may have risen in recent weeks but they are still unattractive. Equities have suffered two big bear markets since 2000 and are wobbling again. It is hardly surprising that pension funds, insurers and endowments are searching for new sources of return.}}
  • Spring; fountainhead; wellhead; any collection of water on or under the surface of the ground in which a stream originates.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-08-16, author= John Vidal
  • , volume=189, issue=10, page=8, magazine=(The Guardian Weekly) , title= Dams endanger ecology of Himalayas , passage=Most of the Himalayan rivers have been relatively untouched by dams near their sources . Now the two great Asian powers, India and China, are rushing to harness them as they cut through some of the world's deepest valleys.}}
  • A reporter's informant.
  • (computing) Source code.
  • (electronics) The name of one terminal of a field effect transistor (FET).
  • Synonyms

    * (l)

    Derived terms

    * sourceless * source code * primary source * secondary source * tertiary source

    See also

    * target

    Verb

  • (chiefly, US) To obtain or procure:
  • To find information about (a quotation)'s source (from which it comes): to find a citation for.
  • Derived terms

    * (mainly US) sourcing * (mainly US) insourcing * (mainly US) outsourcing

    Anagrams

    * ----