Presence vs Contain - What's the difference?

presence | contain |


As a noun presence

is presence.

As a verb contain is

(lb) to hold inside.

presence

English

Alternative forms

* (archaic)

Noun

(en noun)
  • The fact or condition of being present, or of being within sight or call, or at hand.
  • :
  • *
  • *:Carried somehow, somewhither, for some reason, on these surging floods, were these travelers, of errand not wholly obvious to their fellows, yet of such sort as to call into query alike the nature of their errand and their own relations. It is easily earned repetition to state that Josephine St. Auban's was a presence not to be concealed.
  • The part of space within one's immediate vicinity.
  • :
  • A quality of poise and effectiveness that enables a performer to achieve a close relationship with his audience.
  • :
  • Something (as a spirit) felt or believed to be present.
  • :
  • A company's business activity in a particular market.
  • The state of being closely focused on the here and now, not distracted by irrelevant thoughts
  • Antonyms

    * absence

    Derived terms

    * compresence * copresence * presence of mind * real presence * stage presence

    Verb

    (presenc)
  • (philosophy) To make or become present.
  • *
  • * 1985 , David Edward Shaner, The Bodymind Experience in Japanese Buddhism: A Phenomenological Study of K?kai and D?gen , page 59,
  • Within a completely neutral horizon, the primordial continuous stream of experience is presenced' without interruption. As this time, the past and future have no meaning apart from the now in which they are ' presenced .
  • * 1998 , H. Peter Steeves, Founding Community: A Phenomenological-Ethical Inquiry , page 59,
  • Just as the bread and butter can be presenced as more than just the bread and the butter, so baking a loaf of bread can be more than just the baking, the baker, and the bread.
  • * 2005 , James Phillips, Heidegger's Volk: Between National Socialism and Poetry , Stanford University Press, ISBN 0804750718 (paperback), page 118,
  • From the overtaxing of the regime's paranoiac classifications and monitoring of the social field, Heidegger was to await in vain the presencing of that which is present, the revelation of the Being of beings in its precedence to governmental control.
  • *
  • Statistics

    *

    contain

    English

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (lb) To hold inside.
  • *
  • At half-past nine on this Saturday evening, the parlour of the Salutation Inn, High Holborn, contained most of its customary visitors.In former days every tavern of repute kept such a room for its own select circle, a club, or society, of habitués, who met every evening, for a pipe and a cheerful glass.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-07-20, volume=408, issue=8845, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= Welcome to the plastisphere , passage=[The researchers] noticed many of their pieces of [plastic marine] debris sported surface pits around two microns across. Such pits are about the size of a bacterial cell. Closer examination showed that some of these pits did, indeed, contain bacteria,
  • (lb) To include as a part.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2014-04-21, volume=411, issue=8884, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= Subtle effects , passage=Manganism has been known about since the 19th century, when miners exposed to ores containing manganese, a silvery metal, began to totter, slur their speech and behave like someone inebriated.}}
  • (lb) To put constraint upon; to restrain; to confine; to keep within bounds.
  • * (Edmund Spenser) (c.1552–1599)
  • The king's person contains the unruly people from evil occasions.
  • * (William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)
  • Fear not, my lord: we can contain ourselves.
  • *
  • Athelstan Arundel walked home all the way, foaming and raging. No omnibus, cab, or conveyance ever built could contain a young man in such a rage. His mother lived at Pembridge Square, which is four good measured miles from Lincoln's Inn.
  • To have as an element.
  • To restrain desire; to live in continence or chastity.
  • * Bible, vii. 9.
  • But if they can not contain , let them marry.

    Synonyms

    * (hold inside) enclose, inhold * (include as part) comprise, embody, incorporate, inhold * (limit by restraint) control, curb, repress, restrain, restrict, stifle

    Antonyms

    * (include as part) exclude, omit * (limit by restraint) release, vent