Harbor vs Contain - What's the difference?

harbor | contain |


As verbs the difference between harbor and contain

is that harbor is to provide a harbor or safe place for while contain is (lb) to hold inside.

As a noun harbor

is a sheltered expanse of water, adjacent to land, in which ships may dock or anchor, especially for loading and unloading.

harbor

English

Alternative forms

* harbour (Commonwealth) * herberwe (obsolete) * herborough (obsolete)

Noun

(en noun)
  • A sheltered expanse of water, adjacent to land, in which ships may dock or anchor, especially for loading and unloading.
  • A harbor''', even if it is a little '''harbor , is a good thing, since adventurers come into it as well as go out, and the life in it grows strong, because it takes something from the world, and has something to give in return -
  • Any place of shelter.
  • The neighborhood is a well-known harbor for petty thieves.

    Derived terms

    * harborage * harbormaster * harbor seal * safe harbor

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To provide a harbor or safe place for.
  • *{{quote-magazine, year=2013, month=May-June, author= Katie L. Burke
  • , title= In the News , volume=101, issue=3, page=193, magazine=(American Scientist) , passage=Bats host many high-profile viruses that can infect humans, including severe acute respiratory syndrome and Ebola. A recent study explored the ecological variables that may contribute to bats’ propensity to harbor such zoonotic diseases by comparing them with another order of common reservoir hosts: rodents.}}
  • To take refuge or shelter in a protected expanse of water.
  • To hold or persistently entertain in one's thoughts or mind.
  • See also

    * haven * dock

    References

    * * * * * Random House Webster's Unabridged Electronic Dictionary , 1987-1996.

    contain

    English

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (lb) To hold inside.
  • *
  • At half-past nine on this Saturday evening, the parlour of the Salutation Inn, High Holborn, contained most of its customary visitors.In former days every tavern of repute kept such a room for its own select circle, a club, or society, of habitués, who met every evening, for a pipe and a cheerful glass.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-07-20, volume=408, issue=8845, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= Welcome to the plastisphere , passage=[The researchers] noticed many of their pieces of [plastic marine] debris sported surface pits around two microns across. Such pits are about the size of a bacterial cell. Closer examination showed that some of these pits did, indeed, contain bacteria,
  • (lb) To include as a part.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2014-04-21, volume=411, issue=8884, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= Subtle effects , passage=Manganism has been known about since the 19th century, when miners exposed to ores containing manganese, a silvery metal, began to totter, slur their speech and behave like someone inebriated.}}
  • (lb) To put constraint upon; to restrain; to confine; to keep within bounds.
  • * (Edmund Spenser) (c.1552–1599)
  • The king's person contains the unruly people from evil occasions.
  • * (William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)
  • Fear not, my lord: we can contain ourselves.
  • *
  • Athelstan Arundel walked home all the way, foaming and raging. No omnibus, cab, or conveyance ever built could contain a young man in such a rage. His mother lived at Pembridge Square, which is four good measured miles from Lincoln's Inn.
  • To have as an element.
  • To restrain desire; to live in continence or chastity.
  • * Bible, vii. 9.
  • But if they can not contain , let them marry.

    Synonyms

    * (hold inside) enclose, inhold * (include as part) comprise, embody, incorporate, inhold * (limit by restraint) control, curb, repress, restrain, restrict, stifle

    Antonyms

    * (include as part) exclude, omit * (limit by restraint) release, vent