Conservatory vs Conservator - What's the difference?

conservatory | conservator |


As nouns the difference between conservatory and conservator

is that conservatory is (obsolete) that which preserves from injury or conservatory can be a greenhouse or hothouse for the display of plants while conservator is one who conserves, preserves or protects something.

As an adjective conservatory

is (rare) pertaining to conservation.

conservatory

English

Etymology 1

Adjective

(en adjective)
  • (rare) pertaining to conservation
  • Having the quality of preserving from loss, decay, or injury.
  • Noun

    (conservatories)
  • (obsolete) That which preserves from injury.
  • A conservatory of life. — Jeremy Taylor.

    Etymology 2

    Noun

    (conservatories)
  • A greenhouse or hothouse for the display of plants
  • A school of music or drama; a conservatoire
  • Synonyms
    (music) * college of music * conservatory of music * musical school * music conservatory * music department * music school * school of music (drama) * academy of drama * drama school * theater school * theatre school

    conservator

    English

    Alternative forms

    * conservatour (obsolete)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • One who conserves, preserves or protects something.
  • * 2014, (Paul Salopek), Blessed. Cursed. Claimed. , National Geographic (December 2014)[http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2014/12/pilgrim-roads/salopek-text]
  • Chlouveraki, a tenacious archaeological conservator , has salvaged antiquities all over the Middle East.
  • * Derham
  • the great Creator and Conservator of the world
  • (legal) A person appointed by a court to manage the affairs of another; similar to a guardian but with some powers of a trustee.
  • * Clarendon
  • The lords of the secret council were likewise made conservators of the peace of the two kingdoms.
  • * Bouvier
  • the conservator of the estate of an idiot
  • An officer in charge of preserving the public peace, such as a justice or sheriff.
  • (Roman Catholicism) A judge delegated by the pope to defend certain privileged classes of persons from manifest or notorious injury or violence, without recourse to a judicial process.
  • A professional who works on the conservation and restoration of objects, particularly artistic objects.
  • Derived terms

    * conservatorial * conservatorship