Suspense vs Conjecture - What's the difference?

suspense | conjecture |


As a noun suspense

is the condition of being suspended; cessation for a time.

As an adjective suspense

is (obsolete) held or lifted up; held or prevented from proceeding.

As a verb conjecture is

.

suspense

Alternative forms

* (l) (obsolete)

Noun

(-)
  • The condition of being suspended; cessation for a time.
  • * Alexander Pope
  • a cool suspense from pleasure and from pain
  • the pleasurable emotion of anticipation and excitement regarding the outcome or climax of a book, film etc.
  • The unpleasant emotion of anxiety or apprehension in an uncertain situation.
  • * Denham
  • Ten days the prophet in suspense remained.
  • (legal) A temporary cessation of one's right; suspension, as when the rent or other profits of land cease by unity of possession of land and rent.
  • Derived terms

    * suspenseful

    Adjective

    (-)
  • (obsolete) Held or lifted up; held or prevented from proceeding.
  • * Milton
  • [The great light of day] suspense in heaven.
  • (obsolete) Expressing, or proceeding from, suspense or doubt.
  • * Milton
  • Expectation held his look suspense .
    ----

    conjecture

    English

    Noun

  • (formal) A statement or an idea which is unproven, but is thought to be true; a .
  • I explained it, but it is pure conjecture whether he understood, or not.
  • (formal) A supposition based upon incomplete evidence; a hypothesis.
  • The physicist used his conjecture about subatomic particles to design an experiment.
  • (mathematics, philology) A statement likely to be true based on available evidence, but which has not been formally (l).
  • (obsolete) of signs and omens.
  • Synonyms

    * * See also

    Verb

    (conjectur)
  • (formal) To ; to venture an unproven idea.
  • I do not know if it is true; I am simply conjecturing here.
  • * South
  • Human reason can then, at the best, but conjecture what will be.