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Trim vs Condense - What's the difference?

trim | condense | Related terms |

Trim is a related term of condense.


As verbs the difference between trim and condense

is that trim is to reduce slightly; to cut; especially, to remove excess; eg 'trim a hedge', 'trim a beard' the adposition of can be used in present perfect tense to designate the removed part while condense is .

As adjectives the difference between trim and condense

is that trim is physically fit while condense is condensed.

As a noun trim

is (uncountable) decoration; especially, decoration placed along edges or borders.

As an adverb trim

is (nautical) in good order, properly managed or maintained.

trim

English

(wikipedia trim)

Verb

  • To reduce slightly; to cut; especially, to remove excess; e.g. 'trim a hedge', 'trim a beard'. The adposition of can be used in present perfect tense to designate the removed part.
  • (present perfect example)
  • To decorate or adorn; especially, to decorate a Christmas tree.
  • * Milton
  • A rotten building newly trimmed over.
  • * Shakespeare
  • I was trimmed in Julia's gown.
  • * {{quote-book, year=1963, author=(Margery Allingham)
  • , title=(The China Governess) , chapter=1 citation , passage=The half-dozen pieces […] were painted white and carved with festoons of flowers, birds and cupids. […]  The bed was the most extravagant piece.  Its graceful cane halftester rose high towards the cornice and was so festooned in carved white wood that the effect was positively insecure, as if the great couch were trimmed with icing sugar.}}
  • (nautical) To modify the angle of a vessel to the water by shifting cargo or ballast; to adjust for sailing; to assume, or cause a vessel to assume, a certain position, or trim, in the water. (FM 55-501).
  • * 1883 ,
  • The captain made us trim the boat, and we got her to lie a little more evenly.
  • (nautical) To modify the angle of a vessel's sails relative to the wind, especially to set the sails to the most advantageous angle.
  • (dated) To balance; to fluctuate between parties, so as to appear to favour each.
  • To make trim; to put in due order for any purpose; to make right, neat, or pleasing; to adjust.
  • * Goldsmith
  • The hermit trimmed his little fire.
  • (carpentry) To dress (timber); to make smooth.
  • (dated) To rebuke; to reprove; also, to beat.
  • Noun

    (en noun)
  • (uncountable) Decoration; especially, decoration placed along edges or borders.
  • Paint the house white with blue trim .
  • (countable) A haircut, especially a moderate one to touch up an existing style.
  • I went to the hairdresser for a trim but came back nearly bald.
  • Dress; gear; ornaments.
  • * Sir Walter Scott
  • seeing him just pass the window in his woodland trim
  • (countable) The manner in which something is equipped or adorned; order; disposition.
  • The car comes in three different trims .
    to be in good trim
    (Chapman)
  • Sexual intercourse.
  • (nautical) The fore-and-aft angle of the vessel to the water, with reference to the cargo and ballast; the manner in which a vessel floats on the water, whether on an even keel or down by the head or stern.
  • (nautical) The arrangement of the sails with reference to the wind.
  • Adjective

    (trimmer)
  • Physically fit.
  • :
  • Slender, lean.
  • :
  • Neat or smart in appearance.
  • :
  • *1599 , (William Shakespeare), (Much Ado About Nothing) ,
  • *:manhood is melted into curtsies, valour into compliment, and men are only turned into tongue, and trim ones too: he is now as valiant as Hercules that only tells a lie and swears it.
  • *
  • *:“A tight little craft,” was Austin’s invariable comment on the matron; and she looked it, always trim and trig and smooth of surface like a converted yacht cleared for action. ¶ Near her wandered her husband, orientally bland, invariably affable,.
  • Adverb

    (-)
  • (nautical) In good order, properly managed or maintained.
  • (nautical) With sails well trimmed.
  • Usage notes

    * More often used in combinations, eg, "trim-sailed".

    Anagrams

    * ----

    condense

    English

    Alternative forms

    * condence

    Verb

  • To decrease size or volume by concentration toward the essence.
  • An abridged dictionary can be further condensed to pocket size.
    Boiling off water condenses a thin sauce into a soupier mixture.
  • To make more close, compact, or dense; to compress or concentrate.
  • * Milton
  • In what shape they choose, / Dilated or condensed , bright or obscure.
  • * Motley
  • The secret course pursued at Brussels and at Madrid may be condensed into the usual formula, dissimulation, procrastination, and again dissimulation.
  • (chemistry) To transform from a gaseous state into a liquid state via condensation.
  • Synonyms

    * (to decrease size or volume) minify

    Antonyms

    * extend * magnify

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • (archaic) Condensed; compact; dense.
  • The huge condense bodies of planets. — Bentley.
    ----