Communicate vs Comunication - What's the difference?

communicate | comunication |


As a verb communicate

is to impart.

As a noun comunication is

.

communicate

English

Verb

(communicat)
  • To impart
  • # To impart or transmit (information or knowledge) (to) someone; to make known, to tell.
  • It is vital that I communicate this information to you.
  • # To impart or transmit (an intangible quantity, substance); to give a share of.
  • to communicate motion by means of a crank
  • #* Jeremy Taylor
  • Where God is worshipped, there he communicates his blessings and holy influences.
  • # To pass on (a disease) to another person, animal etc.
  • The disease was mainly communicated via rats and other vermin.
  • To share
  • # (obsolete) To share (in); to have in common, to partake of.
  • We shall now consider those functions of intelligence which man communicates with the higher beasts.
  • #* Ben Jonson
  • thousands that communicate our loss
  • # (Christianity) To receive the bread and wine at a celebration of the Eucharist; to take part in Holy Communion.
  • #* 1971 , , Religion and the Decline of Magic , Folio Society 2012, p. 148:
  • The ‘better sort’ might communicate on a separate day; and in some parishes even the quality of the communion wine varied with the social quality of the recipients.
  • # (Christianity) To administer the Holy Communion to (someone).
  • #* Jeremy Taylor
  • She [the church] may communicate him.
  • # To express or convey ideas, either through verbal or nonverbal means; to have intercourse, to exchange information.
  • Many deaf people communicate with sign language.
  • I feel I hardly know him; I just wish he'd communicate with me a little more.
  • # To be connected (with) (another room, vessel etc.) by means of an opening or channel.
  • The living room communicates with the back garden by these French windows.
  • Hyponyms

    * See also

    comunication

    English

    Noun

    (head)