Seizure vs Compulsion - What's the difference?

seizure | compulsion |


As nouns the difference between seizure and compulsion

is that seizure is the act of taking possession, as by force or right of law while compulsion is obsession.

seizure

English

Noun

(en noun) (Search and seizure) (wikipedia seizure)
  • The act of taking possession, as by force or right of law.
  • the seizure of a thief, a property, a throne, etc.
    The search warrant permitted the seizure of evidence.
  • * 1874 , (Marcus Clarke), (For the Term of His Natural Life) Chapter VII
  • As yet there had been no alarm of fever. The three seizures had excited some comment, however, and had it not been for the counter-excitement of the burning ship, it is possible that Pine's precaution would have been thrown away
  • A sudden attack or convulsion, (e.g. an epileptic seizure).
  • He fell to the floor and convulsed when the epilectic seizure occurred.
  • A sudden onset of pain or emotion.
  • He felt the sudden seizure of pain as the heart attack began.
  • (obsolete) retention within one's grasp or power; possession; ownership
  • * Dryden
  • Make o'er thy honour by a deed of trust, / And give me seizure of the mighty wealth.
  • That which is seized, or taken possession of; a thing laid hold of, or possessed.
  • compulsion

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • An irrational need to perform some action, often despite negative consequences.
  • *{{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-07, author=David Simpson
  • , volume=188, issue=26, page=36, magazine=(The Guardian Weekly) , title= Fantasy of navigation , passage=It is tempting to speculate about the incentives or compulsions that might explain why anyone would take to the skies in [the] basket [of a balloon]: perhaps out of a desire to escape the gravity of this world or to get a preview of the next; […].}}
  • The use of authority, influence, or other power to force (compel) a person or persons to act.
  • The lawful use of violence (i.e. by the administration).