Connive vs Complicit - What's the difference?

connive | complicit |


As a verb connive

is to cooperate with others secretly in order to commit a crime; to collude.

As an adjective complicit is

associated with or participating in an activity, especially one of a questionable nature.

connive

English

Verb

(conniv)
  • to cooperate with others secretly in order to commit a crime; to collude
  • to plot or scheme
  • to pretend to be ignorant of something in order to escape blame; to ignore a fault deliberately
  • * Jeremy Taylor
  • to connive at what it does not approve
  • * Burke
  • In many of these, the directors were heartily concurring; in most of them, they were encouraging, and sometimes commanding; in all they were conniving .
  • * Macaulay
  • The government thought it expedient, occasionally, to connive at the violation of this rule.
  • (archaic) To open and close the eyes rapidly; to wink.
  • * Spectator
  • The artist is to teach them how to nod judiciously, and to connive with either eye.
  • to be a wench
  • References

    English control verbs ----

    complicit

    English

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • Associated with or participating in an activity, especially one of a questionable nature.
  • * 1861 , Henry M. Wheeler, The Slaves' Champion , p. 203,
  • It [slavery] has set the seal of a complicit , guilty silence upon the most orthodox pulpits and the saintliest tongues,
  • * 1973 , , As If by Magic , Secker and Warburg, p. 177:
  • "I confess," and the Englishman turned with a near complicit grin to Hamo, "I have certain vulgar tastes myself."
  • * 2005 , Larry Dennsion, " Letters," Time , 7 March:
  • Khan's sale of nuclear secrets and a complicit Pakistani government have made the world a ticking time bomb.

    Synonyms

    * complicitous

    Derived terms

    * complicitly

    References

    * * Oxford English Dictionary , 2nd ed., 1989.