Patient vs Compassion - What's the difference?

patient | compassion |


As nouns the difference between patient and compassion

is that patient is patient, someone who receives therapeutic treatment while compassion is deep awareness of the suffering of another, coupled with the wish to relieve it.

As a verb compassion is

(obsolete) to pity.

patient

English

Adjective

(en-adj)
  • Content to wait if necessary; not losing one's temper while waiting.
  • Be patient : your friends will arrive in a few hours.
  • Constant in pursuit or exertion; persevering; calmly diligent.
  • patient endeavour
  • * Sir Isaac Newton
  • Whatever I have done is due to patient thought.
  • (obsolete) Physically able to suffer or bear.
  • * Bishop Fell
  • patient of severest toil and hardship

    Synonyms

    * composed

    Antonyms

    * impatient * antsy

    Derived terms

    * patiently

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A person or animal who receives treatment from a doctor or other medically educated person.
  • *, chapter=23
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=The slightest effort made the patient cough. He would stand leaning on a stick and holding a hand to his side, and when the paroxysm had passed it left him shaking.}}
  • * {{quote-magazine, title=A better waterworks, date=2013-06-01, volume=407, issue=8838
  • , page=5 (Technology Quarterly), magazine=(The Economist) citation , passage=An artificial kidney these days still means a refrigerator-sized dialysis machine. Such devices mimic
  • (linguistics, grammar) The noun or noun phrase that is semantically on the receiving end of a verb's action.
  • One who, or that which, is passively affected; a passive recipient.
  • * Gov. of Tongue
  • Malice is a passion so impetuous and precipitate that often involves the agent and the patient .

    Antonyms

    * agent

    Derived terms

    * inpatient * outpatient * patient role * patient of something

    See also

    * -end

    Anagrams

    * ----

    compassion

    English

    Noun

  • Deep awareness of the suffering of another, coupled with the wish to relieve it
  • * 1849 , Robert Leighton (Archbishop of Glasgow), A practical commentary upon the first Epistle of St. Peter (page 47)
  • Oh! the unspeakable privilege to have Him for our Father, who is the Father of mercies and compassions , and those not barren, fruitless pityings, for He is withal the God of all consolations.

    Synonyms

    * empathy, pity, ruth, tenderheartedness, sorrow * kindness, heart, mercy

    Derived terms

    * compassionate * compassion fatigue

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (obsolete) To pity.
  • * 1607 , , IV. i. 124:
  • O heavens, can you hear a good man groan / And not relent, or not compassion him?