Dwell vs Companion - What's the difference?

dwell | companion |


As nouns the difference between dwell and companion

is that dwell is (engineering) a period of time in which a system or component remains in a given state while companion is a friend, acquaintance, or partner; someone with whom one spends time or keeps company.

As verbs the difference between dwell and companion

is that dwell is to live; to reside while companion is (obsolete) to be a companion to; to attend on; to accompany.

dwell

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • (engineering) A period of time in which a system or component remains in a given state.
  • (engineering) A brief pause in the motion of part of a mechanism to allow an operation to be completed.
  • (electrical engineering) A planned delay in a timed control program.
  • (automotive) In a petrol engine, the period of time the ignition points are closed to let current flow through the ignition coil in between each spark. This is measured as an angle in degrees around the camshaft in the distributor which controls the points, for example in a 4-cylinder engine it might be 55° (spark at 90° intervals, points closed for 55° between each).
  • Verb

  • To live; to reside.
  • * Peacham
  • the parish in which I was born, dwell , and have possessions
  • * C. J. Smith
  • The poor man dwells in a humble cottage near the hall where the lord of the domain resides.
  • To linger (on ) a particular thought, idea etc.; to remain fixated (on).
  • (engineering) To be in a given state.
  • To abide; to remain; to continue.
  • * Shakespeare
  • I'll rather dwell in my necessity.
  • * Wordsworth
  • Thy soul was like a star and dwelt apart.

    See also

    * abide * live * reside * stay

    References

    * * English irregular verbs

    companion

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A friend, acquaintance, or partner; someone with whom one spends time or keeps company
  • His dog has been his trusted companion for the last five years.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Here are your sons again; and I must lose / Two of the sweetest companions in the world.
  • (dated) A person employed to accompany or travel with another.
  • (nautical) The framework on the quarterdeck of a sailing ship through which daylight entered the cabins below.
  • (nautical) The covering of a hatchway on an upper deck which leads to the companionway; the stairs themselves.
  • (topology) A knot in whose neighborhood another, specified knot meets every meridian disk.
  • (figuratively) A thing or phenomenon that is closely associated with another thing, phenomenon, or person.
  • (astronomy) A celestial object that is associated with another.
  • A knight of the lowest rank in certain orders.
  • a companion of the Bath
  • (obsolete, derogatory) A fellow; a rogue.
  • * 1599 , , III. i. 111:
  • and let us knog our / prains together to be revenge on this same scald, scurvy, / cogging companion ,

    Synonyms

    * See also

    Derived terms

    * companionable, uncompanionable * companion hatch * companion ladder * companionship * companionway

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (obsolete) To be a companion to; to attend on; to accompany.
  • (Ruskin)
  • (obsolete) To qualify as a companion; to make equal.
  • * (rfdate) (William Shakespeare)
  • Companion me with my mistress.