Interchange vs Communicate - What's the difference?

interchange | communicate |


As verbs the difference between interchange and communicate

is that interchange is to switch (each of two things) while communicate is to impart.

As a noun interchange

is an act of interchanging.

interchange

English

Verb

(interchang)
  • to switch (each of two things)
  • to interchange places
  • to mutually give and receive (something); to exchange
  • * Shakespeare
  • I shall interchange / My waned state for Henry's regal crown.
  • to swap or change places
  • to alternate; to intermingle or vary
  • to interchange cares with pleasures

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • An act of interchanging.
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2011 , date=October 29 , author=Neil Johnston , title=Norwich 3 - 3 Blackburn , work=BBC Sport citation , page= , passage=That was one of three superb saves Hennessey made in the opening 45 minutes, the best of which was from Dzeko, who had been released by a slick interchange involving Silva and Sergio Aguero.}}
  • A highway junction in which traffic may change from one road to another without crossing a stream of traffic.
  • (rail transport) A connection between two or more lines, services or modes of transport; a station at which such a connection can be made.
  • Holborn tube station is the only interchange between the London Underground Central and Piccadilly Lines

    Usage notes

    Generally the rail transport sense of "interchange" applies to connections within the same station, or from two close-by stations. Sometimes, especially within the context of public transport in London, "interchange" is restricted to within-station connections only with (outerchange) used for those that involve leaving the station.

    Antonyms

    * (rail transport) outerchange

    communicate

    English

    Verb

    (communicat)
  • To impart
  • # To impart or transmit (information or knowledge) (to) someone; to make known, to tell.
  • It is vital that I communicate this information to you.
  • # To impart or transmit (an intangible quantity, substance); to give a share of.
  • to communicate motion by means of a crank
  • #* Jeremy Taylor
  • Where God is worshipped, there he communicates his blessings and holy influences.
  • # To pass on (a disease) to another person, animal etc.
  • The disease was mainly communicated via rats and other vermin.
  • To share
  • # (obsolete) To share (in); to have in common, to partake of.
  • We shall now consider those functions of intelligence which man communicates with the higher beasts.
  • #* Ben Jonson
  • thousands that communicate our loss
  • # (Christianity) To receive the bread and wine at a celebration of the Eucharist; to take part in Holy Communion.
  • #* 1971 , , Religion and the Decline of Magic , Folio Society 2012, p. 148:
  • The ‘better sort’ might communicate on a separate day; and in some parishes even the quality of the communion wine varied with the social quality of the recipients.
  • # (Christianity) To administer the Holy Communion to (someone).
  • #* Jeremy Taylor
  • She [the church] may communicate him.
  • # To express or convey ideas, either through verbal or nonverbal means; to have intercourse, to exchange information.
  • Many deaf people communicate with sign language.
  • I feel I hardly know him; I just wish he'd communicate with me a little more.
  • # To be connected (with) (another room, vessel etc.) by means of an opening or channel.
  • The living room communicates with the back garden by these French windows.
  • Hyponyms

    * See also