Push vs Come - What's the difference?

push | come |


As verbs the difference between push and come

is that push is (intransitive) to apply a force to (an object) such that it moves away from the person or thing applying the force while come is to (to consume food).

As a noun push

is a short, directed application of force; an act of pushing or push can be (obsolete|uk|dialect) a pustule; a pimple.

push

English

Etymology 1

(etyl) ).

Verb

(es)
  • (intransitive) To apply a force to (an object) such that it moves away from the person or thing applying the force.
  • In his anger he pushed me against the wall and threatened me.
    You need to push quite hard to get this door open.
  • To continually attempt to persuade (a person) into a particular course of action.
  • * Jonathan Swift
  • We are pushed for an answer.
  • * Spectator
  • Ambition pushes the soul to such actions as are apt to procure honour to the actor.
  • To press or urge forward; to drive.
  • to push''' an objection too far; to '''push one's luck
  • * Dryden
  • to push his fortune
  • To continually promote (a point of view, a product for sale, etc.).
  • Stop pushing the issue — I'm not interested.
    They're pushing that perfume again.
    There were two men hanging around the school gates today, pushing drugs.
  • (informal) To approach; to come close to.
  • My old car is pushing 250,000 miles.
    He's pushing sixty.'' (= ''he's nearly sixty years old )
  • To tense the muscles in the abdomen in order to expel its contents.
  • During childbirth, there are times when the obstetrician advises the woman not to push .
  • To continue to attempt to persuade a person into a particular course of action.
  • To make a higher bid at an auction.
  • (poker) To make an all-in bet.
  • (chess) To move (a pawn) directly forward.
  • (computing) To add (a data item) to the top of a stack.
  • * 1992 , Michael A. Miller, The 68000 Microprocessor Family: Architecture, Programming, and Applications (page 47)
  • When the microprocessor decodes the JSR opcode, it stores the operand into the TEMP register and pushes the current contents of the PC ($00 0128) onto the stack.
  • (obsolete) To thrust the points of the horns against; to gore.
  • * Bible, Exodus xxi. 32
  • If the ox shall push a manservant or maidservant, the ox shall be stoned.
  • To burst out of its pot, as a bud or shoot.
  • Synonyms
    * to press, to shove, to thrutch * (continue to attempt to persuade) to press, to urge * (continue to promote) to press, to advertise, to promote * (come close to) to approach, to near * to press, to shove, to thring * (tense the muscles in the abdomen in order to expel its contents) to bear down
    Antonyms
    * (apply a force to something so it moves away) to draw, to pull, to tug * (put onto a stack) to pop
    Derived terms
    * pedal pushers * push around * push-bike * pushful * push in * push off * push one's luck * pushover * push someone's buttons * push it * push-up * pushy

    Noun

    (es)
  • A short, directed application of force; an act of pushing.
  • Give the door a hard push if it sticks.
  • An act of tensing the muscles of the abdomen in order to expel its contents.
  • One more push and the baby will be out.
  • A great effort (to do something).
  • Some details got lost in the push to get the project done.
    Let's give one last push on our advertising campaign.
  • (military) A marching or drill maneuver/manoeuvre performed by moving a formation (especially a company front) forward or toward the audience, usually to accompany a dramatic climax or crescendo in the music.
  • A wager that results in no loss or gain for the bettor as a result of a tie or even score
  • (computing) The addition of a data item to the top of a stack.
  • (Internet, uncountable) The situation where a server sends data to a client without waiting for a request, as in server push'', ''push technology .
  • (dated) A crowd or throng or people
  • * 1891 , Banjo Paterson,
  • Till some wild, excited person
    Galloped down the township cursing,
    "Sydney push have mobbed Macpherson,
    Roll up, Dandaloo!"
    Derived terms
    * give someone the push

    Etymology 2

    Probably (etyl) poche. See pouch.

    Noun

    (es)
  • (obsolete, UK, dialect) A pustule; a pimple.
  • (Francis Bacon)
    1000 English basic words ----

    come

    English

    (wikipedia come)

    Verb

  • (label) To move from further away to nearer to.
  • * (William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)
  • Look, who comes yonder?
  • * (1809-1892)
  • I did not come to curse thee.
  • # To move towards the speaker.
  • # To move towards the listener.
  • # To move towards the object that is the of the sentence.
  • # (label) To move towards the or subject of the main clause.
  • # To move towards an unstated agent.
  • (label) To arrive.
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=5 , passage=Then came a maid with hand-bag and shawls, and after her a tall young lady. She stood for a moment holding her skirt above the grimy steps,
  • (label) To appear, to manifest itself.
  • * (1613-1680), (Hudibras)
  • when butter does refuse to come [i.e. to form]
  • (label) To take a position to something else in a sequence.
  • To achieve orgasm; to cum.
  • To approach a state of being or accomplishment.
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=3 , passage=Now all this was very fine, but not at all in keeping with the Celebrity's character as I had come' to conceive it. The idea that adulation ever cloyed on him was ludicrous in itself. In fact I thought the whole story fishy, and ' came very near to saying so.}}
  • To take a particular approach or point of view in regard to something.
  • To become, to turn out to be.
  • * (William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)
  • How come you thus estranged?
  • (label) To be supplied, or made available; to exist.
  • (label) To carry through; to succeed in.
  • (label) Happen.
  • *{{quote-magazine, date=2014-06-14, volume=411, issue=8891, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= It's a gas , passage=But out of sight is out of mind. And that
  • To have a social background.
  • # To be or have been a resident or native.
  • # To have been brought up by or employed by.
  • To germinate.
  • Usage notes

    In its general sense, come'' specifically marks motion towards the (whether explicitly stated or not). Its counterpart, usually referring to motion away from or not involving the deictic centre, is ''go''. For example, the sentence "Come to the tree" implies contextually that the speaker is already at the tree - "Go to the tree" often implies that the speaker is elsewhere. Either the speaker or the listener can be the deictic centre - the sentences "I will go to you" and "I will come to you" are both valid, depending on the exact nuances of the context. When there is no clear speaker or listener, the deictic centre is usually the focus of the sentence or the topic of the piece of writing. "Millions of people came''' to America from Europe" would be used in an article about America, but "Millions of people ' went to America from Europe" would be used in an article about Europe. When used with adverbs of location, come'' is usually paired with ''here'' or ''hither''. In interrogatives, ''come'' usually indicates a question about source - "Where are you coming from?" - while ''go indicates a question about destination - "Where are you going?" or "Where are you going to?" A few old texts use comen as the past participle. The phrase "dream come true" is a set phrase; the verb "come" in the sense "become" is archaic outside of that set phrase and the collocation "come about". The collocations “come with” and “come along” mean accompany, used as “Do you want to come with me?” and “Do you want to come along?” In the Midwestern American dialect, “come with” can occur without a following object, as in “Do you want to come with?” In this dialect, “with” can also be used in this way with some other verbs, such as “take with”. Examples of this may be found in plays by Chicagoan (David Mamet), such as (American Buffalo). Chicago Dialect This objectless use is not permissible in other dialects.

    Antonyms

    *

    Derived terms

    * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    See also

    * cam'st * kingdom come

    Noun

    (-)
  • (obsolete) Coming, arrival; approach.
  • * 1869 , RD Blackmoore, Lorna Doone , II:
  • “If we count three before the come of thee, thwacked thou art, and must go to the women.”
  • (slang) Semen, or female ejaculatory discharge.
  • See also

    * cum

    Preposition

    (English prepositions)
  • Leave it to settle for about three months and, come Christmas time, you'll have a delicious concoctions to offer your guests.
    Come retirement, their Social Security may turn out to be a lot less than they counted on.
  • * '>citation
  • Come the final whistle, Mikel Arteta lay flabbergasted on the turf.

    Usage notes

    * is often used when both the indicated event, period or change in state occurred in the past.

    Interjection

    (en interjection)
  • An exclamation to express annoyance.
  • :
  • An exclamation to express encouragement, or to precede a request.
  • :
  • *
  • *:“I'm through with all pawn-games,” I laughed. “Come , let us have a game of lansquenet. Either I will take a farewell fall out of you or you will have your sevenfold revenge”.
  • References